The educational settings of profoundly deaf children with cochlear implants compared with age-matched peers with hearing aids: implications for management


Archbold, S.M., Nikolopoulos, T.P., O'Donoghue, G.M. and Lutman, M.E. (2002) The educational settings of profoundly deaf children with cochlear implants compared with age-matched peers with hearing aids: implications for management. International Journal of Audiology, 41, (3), 157-161.

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Description/Abstract

The educational settings of 42 implanted profoundly deaf children 3 years after implantation were compared with the respective settings of 635 age-matched severely deaf and 511 profoundly deaf children with hearing aids. All implanted children received their implants before beginning school. The results revealed that 3 years after implantation. 38% (16 children) of the implanted profoundly deaf children attended mainstream schools, whereas 57% (24 children) were in a unit, or special class, in a mainstream school, and 5% (two children) were in schools for the deaf. With regard to the age-matched profoundly deaf children with hearing aids, 12% (63 children) attended mainstream schools, whereas 55% (281 children) were in a unit of a mainstream school, and 33% (167 children) were in schools for the deaf. In the group of age-matched severely deaf children, 38% (239 children) attended mainstream schools, whereas 51% (326 children) were in a unit of a mainstream school, and 11% (70 children) were in schools for the deaf. Statistical analysis revealed a highly significant difference between the educational placement of implanted children and hearing-aided profoundly deaf children (p<0.00001), whereas there was no statistically significant difference between implanted children and hearing-aided severely deaf children. In conclusion, implanted profoundly deaf children who have received their implants before beginning school have the same profile of educational placement as aided severely deaf children rather than aided profoundly deaf children of the same age in the UK. This is likely to have significant implications for the future management of profoundly deaf children and to influence future planning of educational support services.

Item Type: Article
Related URLs:
Subjects: L Education > LC Special aspects of education
R Medicine > RF Otorhinolaryngology
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
Q Science > QC Physics
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > Institute of Sound and Vibration Research > Human Sciences
ePrint ID: 10635
Date Deposited: 16 Jun 2005
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 18:02
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/10635

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