'It's not their job to soldier': distinguishing civilian and military in soldiers' and interpreters' accounts of peacekeeping in 1990s Bosnia-Herzegovina


Baker, Catherine (2010) 'It's not their job to soldier': distinguishing civilian and military in soldiers' and interpreters' accounts of peacekeeping in 1990s Bosnia-Herzegovina. Journal of War and Culture Studies, 3, (1), 137-150. (doi:10.1386/jwcs.3.1.137_1).

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Description/Abstract

Peacekeeping operations throw the use of specialized military forces and the aim of accomplishing change in a civilian environment into contradiction. Organizations with cultures that facilitate warfighting have to reorient themselves towards achieving peace and consent rather than victory, making peacekeeping a process of constant intercultural encounters between ‘military’ and ‘civilian’ as well as between ‘international’ and ‘local’. The force’s local employees, civilians necessary in the force’s military tasks, inhabited a particularly ambiguous position. Based on more than 30 oral history interviews with peacekeepers and local interpreters who worked in Bosnia-Herzegovina, this paper shows how four dimensions of cultural and bodily difference emerged from their narratives: uniforms, weapons, disruptiveness and training.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 1752-6272 (print)
Related URLs:
Keywords: peacekeeping, military, civilian, bosnia-herzegovina
Subjects: J Political Science > JZ International relations
P Language and Literature > PB Modern European Languages
U Military Science > U Military Science (General)
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Humanities > Modern Languages
ePrint ID: 141604
Date Deposited: 30 Mar 2010 10:20
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 19:03
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/141604

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