Eye movement behavior during reading of Japanese sentences: effects of word length and visual complexity


White, Sarah J., Hirotiani, Masako and Liversedge, Simon P. (2010) Eye movement behavior during reading of Japanese sentences: effects of word length and visual complexity. Reading and Writing (doi:10.1007/s11145-010-9289-0). (In Press).

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Description/Abstract

Two experiments are presented that examine how the visual characteristics of Japanese words influence eye movement behaviour during reading. In Experiment 1, reading behaviour was compared for words comprising either one or two kanji characters. The one-character words were significantly less likely to be fixated on first-pass, and had significantly longer overall reading times, than the two-character words. In Experiment 2, reading behaviour was compared for two-kanji character words, for which the first character was either visually simple or visually complex (determined by the number of strokes). Visual complexity significantly influenced total word reading times and the probability of the individual visually simple/complex characters being fixated on first pass. Additional analyses showed no preferred viewing position for two-kanji character words. Overall, the study provides experimental evidence of an influence of specific visual characteristics of Japanese words on eye movement behaviour during reading, as shown by both fixation probabilities and reading times. The findings must be explained by processing at (or beyond) a visual level impacting on eye movement behavior during reading of Japanese text.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Online First article
ISSNs: 0922-4777 (print)
1573-0905 (electronic)
Keywords: reading, eye movements, japanese, word length, visual complexity
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
P Language and Literature > PL Languages and literatures of Eastern Asia, Africa, Oceania
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Psychology > Division of Cognition
ePrint ID: 145759
Date Deposited: 16 Feb 2011 11:40
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 19:06
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/145759

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