Viscoelasticity of staphylococcus aureus biofilms in response to fluid shear allows resistance to detachment and facilitates rolling migration


Rupp, Cory J., Fux, Christoph A. and Stoodley, Paul (2005) Viscoelasticity of staphylococcus aureus biofilms in response to fluid shear allows resistance to detachment and facilitates rolling migration. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 71, (4), 2175-2178.

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Description/Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections and endocarditis. Both involve (i) biofilm formation, (ii) exposure to fluid shear, and (iii) high rates of dissemination. We found that viscoelasticity allowed S. aureus biofilms to resist detachment due to increased fluid shear by deformation, while remaining attached to a surface. Further, we report that S. aureus microcolonies moved downstream by rolling along the lumen walls of a glass flow cell, driven by the flow of the overlying fluid. The rolling appeared to be controlled by viscoelastic tethers. This tethered rolling may be important for the surface colonization of medical devices by nonmotile bacteria.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 0099-2240 (print)
Related URLs:
Subjects: Q Science > QR Microbiology > QR355 Virology
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Engineering Sciences > Engineering Materials & Surface Engineering
ePrint ID: 155973
Date Deposited: 08 Jun 2010 16:07
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 19:13
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/155973

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