Injury mortality in rural South Africa 2000 – 2007: rates and associated factors


Garrib, Amupam, Herbst, Abraham J., Hosegood, Victoria and Newell, Marie-Louise (2011) Injury mortality in rural South Africa 2000 – 2007: rates and associated factors. Tropical Medicine and International Health, 16, (4), 439-446. (doi:10.1111/j.1365-3156.2011.02730.x). (PMID:21284789).

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Description/Abstract

Objective: To estimate injury mortality rates in a rural population in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa and to identify socio-demographic risk factors associated with adult injury-related deaths.

Methods: The study used population-based mortality data collected by a demographic surveillance system on all resident and non-resident members of 11 000 households. Deaths and person-years of observation (pyo) were aggregated for individuals between 01 January 2000 and 31 December 2007. Cause of death was determined by verbal autopsy, coded using ICD-10 and further categorised using global burden of disease categories. Socio-demographic risk factors associated with injuries were examined using regression analyses.

Results: We analysed data on 133 483 individuals with 717 584.6 person-years of observation (pyo) and 11 467 deaths. Of deaths, 8.9% were because of injury-related causes; 11% occurred in children <15 years old. Homicide, road traffic injuries and suicide were the major causes. The estimated crude injury mortality rate was 142.4 (134.0, 151.4)/100 000 pyo; 116.9 (108.1, 126.5)/100 000 pyo among residents and 216.8 (196.5, 239.2)/100 000 pyo among non-residents. In multivariable analyses, the differences between residents and non-residents remained but were no longer significant for women. In men and women, full-time employment was significantly associated with lower mortality [adjusted rate ratios 0.6 (0.4, 0.9); 0.4 (0.2, 0.9)]; in men, higher asset ownership was independently associated with increased mortality [adjusted rate ratio 1.5 (1.1, 1.9)].

Conclusions: Reducing the high levels of injury-related mortality in South Africa requires intersectoral primary prevention efforts that redress the root causes of violent and accidental deaths: social inequality, poverty and alcohol abuse.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 1360-2276 (print)
1365-3156 (electronic)
Alternative titles: Mortalité par traumatisme en zone rurale d’Afrique du Sud, 2000-2007: taux et facteurs associés
Keywords: mortality, wounds and injuries, rural population, south africa, epidemiology, road traffic injuries
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HA Statistics
H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Social Sciences > Social Statistics
ePrint ID: 174659
Date Deposited: 16 Feb 2011 09:12
Last Modified: 28 Mar 2014 15:20
Projects:
Centre for Population Change: Understanding Population Change in the 21st Century
Funded by: ESRC (RES-625-28-0001)
Led by: Jane Cecelia Falkingham
1 January 2009 to 31 December 2013
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/174659

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