Parent-based therapies for preschool attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a randomized, controlled trial with a community sample


Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.S., Daley, David, Thompson, Margaret, Laver-Bradbury, Cathy and Weeks, Anne (2001) Parent-based therapies for preschool attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a randomized, controlled trial with a community sample. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 40, (4), 402-408. (doi:10.1097/00004583-200104000-00008).

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Description/Abstract

Objective: To evaluate two different parent-based therapies for preschool attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a community sample.

Method: Three-year-old children displaying a preschool equivalent of ADHD (n = 78) were randomly assigned to either a parent training (PT;n = 30), a parent counseling and support (PC&S;n = 28), or a waiting-list control group (n = 20). The PT group received coaching in child management techniques. The PC&S group received nondirective support and counseling. Measures of child symptoms and mothers' well-being were taken before and after intervention and at 15 weeks follow-up.

Results: ADHD symptoms were reduced (F2,74 = 11.64;p < .0001) and mothers' sense of well-being was increased by PT relative to both other groups (F2,74 = 10.32;p < .005). Fifty-three percent of children in the PT group displayed clinically significant improvement ([chi]2 = 4.08;p = .048).

Conclusions: PT is a valuable treatment for preschool ADHD. PC&S had little effect on children's behavior. Constructive training in parenting strategies is an important element in the success of parent-based interventions. Psychostimulants are not a necessary component of effective treatment for many children with preschool ADHD.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 0890-8567 (print)
Related URLs:
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Medicine > Clinical Neurosciences
University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Psychology > Division of Clinical Neuroscience
ePrint ID: 18271
Date Deposited: 19 Jan 2006
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 18:08
Contact Email Address: ejb3@soton.ac.uk
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/18271

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