Using artificial bat sonar neural networks for complex pattern recognition: recognizing faces and the speed of a moving target


Dror, I.E., Florer, F.L., Rios, D. and Zagaeski, M. (1996) Using artificial bat sonar neural networks for complex pattern recognition: recognizing faces and the speed of a moving target. Biological Cybernetics, 74, (4), 331-338.

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Description/Abstract

Two sets of studies examined the viability of using bat-like sonar input for artificial neural networks in complex pattern recognition tasks. In the first set of studies, a sonar neural network was required to perform two face recognition tasks. In the first task, the network was trained to recognize different faces regardless of facial expressions. Following training, the network was tested on its ability to generalize and correctly recognize faces using echoes of novel facial expressions that were not included in the training set. The neural network was able to recognize novel echoes of faces almost perfectly (above 96% accuracy) when it was required to recognize up to five faces. In the second face recognition task, a sonar neural network was trained to recognize the sex of 16 faces (eight males and eight females). After training, the network was able to correctly recognize novel echoes of those faces as 'male' or as 'female' faces with accuracy levels of 88%. However, the network was not able to recognize novel faces as 'male' or 'female' faces. In the second set of studies, a sonar neural network was required to learn to recognize the speed of a target that was moving towards the viewer. During training, the target was presented in a variety of orientations, and the network's performance was evaluated when the target was presented in novel orientations that were not included in the training set. The different orientations dramatically affected the amplitude and the frequency composition of the echoes. The neural network was able to learn and recognize the speed of a moving target, and to generalize to new orientations of the target. However, the network was not able to generalize to new speeds that were not included in the training set. The potential and limitations of using bat-like sonar as input for artifical neural networks are discussed.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 0340-1200 (print)
Related URLs:
Subjects: T Technology > T Technology (General)
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Psychology > Division of Cognition
ePrint ID: 18335
Date Deposited: 11 Jan 2006
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 18:08
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/18335

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