Expertise and gambling: Using type-2 signal detection theory to investigate differences between regular gamblers and non-gamblers


Lueddeke, S. and Higham, P.A. (2011) Expertise and gambling: Using type-2 signal detection theory to investigate differences between regular gamblers and non-gamblers. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (doi:10.1080/17470218.2011.584631).

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Description/Abstract

This paper presents an experimental investigation into how individuals make decisions under uncertainty when faced with different payout structures in the context of gambling. Type-2 signal detection theory was utilised to compare sensitivity to bias manipulations between regular non-problem gamblers and non-gamblers in a novel probability-based gambling task. The results indicated that both regular gamblers and non-gamblers responded to the changes of rewards for correct responses (Experiment 1) and penalties for errors (Experiment 2) in setting their gambling criteria, but that regular gamblers were more sensitive to these manipulations of bias. Regular gamblers also set gambling criteria that were more optimal. The results are discussed in terms of an expertise-transference hypothesis.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 0272-4995 (print)
1464-1321 (electronic)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > HA Statistics
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Psychology > Division of Cognition
ePrint ID: 185231
Date Deposited: 10 May 2011 10:07
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 19:40
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/185231

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