An analysis of fertility differentials in Liberia and Ghana using multilevel models


Parr, Nicholas John (1992) An analysis of fertility differentials in Liberia and Ghana using multilevel models. University of Southampton, Department of Social Statistics, Doctoral Thesis , 496pp.

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Description/Abstract

This thesis investigates differentials in the levels of fertility,
nuptiality and contraceptive use in Liberia and Ghana, using data
from the recent Demographic and Health Surveys in these countries.
Of particular interest is the effect of the community in which a
woman lives on her current and past fertility, her marital status
and her use of contraception. This interest stems from the fact
that, although the community in which a woman lives is integral to
anthropological explanations of fertility, statistical models of
fertility have rarely included an assessment of community effects.

The method of analysis used is multilevel modelling. This
involves fitting variables measured at the woman level, variables
measured at the community level and also includes the use of
random effects to assess the extent to which community effects
have not been captured by the fixed explanatory variables.
Multilevel log-linear models are used in the analyses of fertility
and multilevel logistic models are used in the analyses of
nuptiality and contraceptive use.

This thesis demonstrates not only that there is significant
variation between communities in both Liberia and Ghana for number
of births 0-4 years before survey, children ever born, marital
status and use of contraception but also that in each case
significant community effects are found even after controlling for
woman's age, education, religion and ethnicity.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HA Statistics
H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Social Sciences
ePrint ID: 192425
Date Deposited: 11 Jul 2011 15:52
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 19:43
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/192425

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