DNA fusion gene vaccines induce cytotoxic T-cell attack on naturally processed peptides of human prostate-specific membrane antigen


Vittes, Gisella E., Harden, Elena L., Ottensmeier, Christian H., Rice, Jason and Stevenson, Freda K. (2011) DNA fusion gene vaccines induce cytotoxic T-cell attack on naturally processed peptides of human prostate-specific membrane antigen. European Journal of Immunology, 41, (8), 2447-2456. (doi:10.1002/eji.201141518). (PMID:21604260).

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Description/Abstract

For long-term attack on tumor cells in patients with prostate cancer, induction of cytolytic T cells is desirable. Several lineage-specific target proteins are known and algorithms have identified candidate MHC class I-binding peptides, particularly for HLA-A*0201. We have designed tolerance-breaking DNA fusion vaccines incorporating a domain of tetanus toxin fused to candidate tumor-derived peptide sequences. Using three separate peptide sequences from prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) (peptides PSMA(27) , PSMA(663) , and PSMA(711) ), this vaccine design induced high levels of CD8(+) T cells against each peptide in a HLA-A(*) 0201 preclinical model. In contrast, the full-length PSMA sequence containing all three epitopes was poorly immunogenic. Induced T cells were cytotoxic against peptide-loaded tumor cells, but only those against PSMA(27) or PSMA(663) peptides, and not PSMA(711) , were able to kill tumor cells expressing endogenous PSMA. Cytotoxicity was also evident in vivo. The preclinical model provides a powerful tool for generating CD8(+) T cells able to predict whether target cells can process and present peptides, essential for planning peptide vaccine-based clinical trials.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 0014-2980 (print)
1521-4141 (electronic)
Keywords: antigen presentation/processing, immunotherapy, t cells, vaccination
Subjects: Q Science > QR Microbiology > QR180 Immunology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0254 Neoplasms. Tumors. Oncology (including Cancer)
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine > Cancer Sciences
ePrint ID: 200259
Date Deposited: 24 Oct 2011 14:38
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 19:46
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/200259

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