Sustainable technologies for auxiliary truck power and trailer refrigeration – a review of the evidence


Velazquez, Anthony, Cherrett, Tom and Waterson, Ben (2011) Sustainable technologies for auxiliary truck power and trailer refrigeration – a review of the evidence. In, 16th Annual Logistics Research Network (LRN) Conference, Southampton, GB, 07 - 09 Sep 2011.

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Description/Abstract

Diesel is the main fuel choice for commercial vehicles and its combustion produces CO2 which is considered the main contributor to global warming. For this reason, the government has targeted road transport to reduce its carbon footprint and it has developed different policy instruments to achieve this goal, such as the Low Carbon Transport Innovation Strategy (LCTIS) which encourages innovation and technology development in lower carbon transport technologies. Lower carbon footprints can benefit road hauliers to some extent, because usually this is achieved by reducing fuel consumption, which in turn decreases operating costs and therefore improves profitability. Nevertheless current technologies are at different stages of maturity and logistics companies considering adopting ‘green’ technology need to assess each in turn bearing in mind the trade-off between fuel savings and whole life cycle costs. The aim of this paper is to determine the extent to which low-carbon technologies and fuels are being used or could be used in the context of road haulage regarding auxiliary truck power (air conditioning and appliances) and trailer refrigeration units (TRUs).

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HE Transportation and Communications
Divisions: Faculty of Engineering and the Environment > Civil, Maritime and Environmental Engineering and Science > Transportation Research Group
ePrint ID: 207823
Date Deposited: 12 Jan 2012 16:27
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 19:49
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/207823

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