After-death interviews with surrogates/bereaved family members: some issues of validity


Addington-Hall, J. and McPherson, C. (2001) After-death interviews with surrogates/bereaved family members: some issues of validity. Journal of Pain and Sympton Management, 22, (3), 784-790. (doi:10.1016/S0885-3924(01)00330-X).

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Description/Abstract

After-death interviews with bereaved respondents are an important tool in the repertoire of researchers evaluating the quality of end-of-life care or investigating the experiences of people at the end of life. Despite the importance of after-death interviews to our understanding of the last months of life, the validity of the information gathered has received little attention. In this article, we review some of the available information, drawing on evidence from cognitive psychology as well as from palliative care studies. Findings from cognitive psychology indicate that memory is a dynamic process, influenced by emotion state and the individual's perspective at the time of the event and at recall. Further research is therefore needed to understand better the circumstances, types of information and research questions for which bereaved relatives are valid surrogates for people who have died.

Item Type: Article
Related URLs:
Keywords: Survey methods, quality assurance, bereavement, surrogates
Subjects: R Medicine > RT Nursing
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > Superseded (SONM) > Superseded (CPE)
University Structure - Pre August 2011 > Superseded (SONM)
ePrint ID: 23978
Date Deposited: 20 Mar 2006
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 18:13
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/23978

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