The thrifty phenotype hypothesis


Hales, C. Nicholas and Barker, David J.P. (2001) The thrifty phenotype hypothesis. British Medical Bulletin, 60, (1), 5-20.

Download

Full text not available from this repository.

Description/Abstract

The thrifty phenotype hypothesis proposes that the epidemiological associations between poor fetal and infant growth and the subsequent development of type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome result from the effects of poor nutrition in early life, which produces permanent changes in glucose-insulin metabolism. These changes include reduced capacity for insulin secretion and insulin resistance which, combined with effects of obesity, ageing and physical inactivity, are the most important factors in determining type 2 diabetes.

Since the hypothesis was proposed, many studies world-wide have confirmed the initial epidemiological evidence, although the strength of the relationships has varied from one study to another. The relationship with insulin resistance is clear at all ages studied. Less clear is the relationship with insulin secretion. The relative contribution of genes and environment to these relationships remains a matter of debate. The contributions of maternal hyperglycaemia and the trajectory of postnatal growth need to be clarified.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 0007-1420 (print)
Related URLs:
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH426 Genetics
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Medicine > Developmental Origins of Health and Disease
ePrint ID: 25576
Date Deposited: 20 Apr 2006
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 18:14
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/25576

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item