Fetal Origins of Adult Disease. A hypothesis about a mechanism for the programming of blood pressure and vascular disease in early life


Martyn, C.N. and Greenwald, S.E. (2001) Fetal Origins of Adult Disease. A hypothesis about a mechanism for the programming of blood pressure and vascular disease in early life. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 28, (11), 948-951. (doi:10.1046/j.1440-1681.2001.03555.x).

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Description/Abstract

1. There is now a great deal of evidence that people whose weight at birth was low tend to have higher blood pressure and increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease as adults.

2. We argue that, in fetuses whose growth is impaired, synthesis of elastin in the walls of the aorta and large arteries is deficient and that this deficiency leads to permanent changes in the mechanical properties of these vessels.

3. Over a lifetime, such changes could predispose an individual to higher blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 0305-1870 (print)
Related URLs:
Keywords: blood pressure, elastin, fetal growth, programming, vascular structure
Subjects: R Medicine > RB Pathology
R Medicine > RG Gynecology and obstetrics
Q Science > QP Physiology
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Medicine > Developmental Origins of Health and Disease
ePrint ID: 25789
Date Deposited: 21 Apr 2006
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 18:14
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/25789

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