Breathing exercises for asthma: a randomised controlled trial


Thomas, M, McKinley, R.K., Mellor, S., Watkinson, G., Holloway, E., Scullion, J., Shaw, D.E., Wardlaw, A., Price, D. and Pavord, I. (2009) Breathing exercises for asthma: a randomised controlled trial. Thorax, 64, 55-61. (doi:10.1136/thx.2008.100867). (PMID:19052047).

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Description/Abstract

Background: The effect of breathing modification techniques on asthma symptoms and objective disease control is uncertain.

Methods: A prospective, parallel group, single-blind, randomised controlled trial comparing breathing training with asthma education (to control for non-specific effects of clinician attention) was performed. Subjects with asthma with impaired health status managed in primary care were randomised to receive three sessions of either physiotherapist-supervised breathing training (n = 94) or asthma nurse-delivered asthma education (n = 89). The main outcome was Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) score, with secondary outcomes including spirometry, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, exhaled nitric oxide, induced sputum eosinophil count and Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) and hyperventilation (Nijmegen) questionnaire scores.

Results: One month after the intervention there were similar improvements in AQLQ scores from baseline in both groups but at 6 months there was a significant between-group difference favouring breathing training (0.38 units, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.68). At the 6-month assessment there were significant between-group differences favouring breathing training in HAD anxiety (1.1, 95% CI 0.2 to 1.9), HAD depression (0.8, 95% CI 0.1 to 1.4) and Nijmegen (3.2, 95% CI 1.0 to 5.4) scores, with trends to improved ACQ (0.2, 95% CI 0.0 to 0.4). No significant between-group differences were seen at 1 month. Breathing training was not associated with significant changes in airways physiology, inflammation or hyper-responsiveness.

Conclusion: Breathing training resulted in improvements in asthma-specific health status and other patient-centred measures but not in asthma pathophysiology. Such exercises may help patients whose quality of life is impaired by asthma, but they are unlikely to reduce the need for anti-inflammatory medication.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 0040-6376 (print)
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine > Primary Care and Population Sciences
ePrint ID: 337232
Date Deposited: 20 Apr 2012 08:43
Last Modified: 07 Jul 2014 13:44
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/337232

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