Cyclophosphamide, thalidomide, and dexamethasone (CTD) as initial therapy for patients with multiple myeloma unsuitable for autologous transplantation


Morgan, G. J., Davies, F. E., Gregory, W. M., Russell, N. H., Bell, S. E., Szubert, A. J., Coy, N. N., Cook, G., Feyler, S., Byrne, J. L., Roddie, H., Rudin, C., Drayson, M. T., Owen, R. G., Ross, F. M., Jackson, G. H. and Child, J. A. (2011) Cyclophosphamide, thalidomide, and dexamethasone (CTD) as initial therapy for patients with multiple myeloma unsuitable for autologous transplantation. Blood, 118, (5), 1231-1238. (doi:10.1182/blood-2011-02-338665).

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Description/Abstract

As part of the randomized MRC Myeloma IX trial, we compared an attenuated regimen of cyclophosphamide, thalidomide, and dexamethasone (CTDa; n = 426) with melphalan and prednisolone (MP; n = 423) in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma ineligible for autologous stem-cell transplantation. The primary endpoints were overall response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival (OS). The overall response rate was significantly higher with CTDa than MP (63.8% vs 32.6%; P < .0001), primarily because of increases in the rate of complete responses (13.1% vs 2.4%) and very good partial responses (16.9% vs 1.7%). Progression-free survival and OS were similar between groups. In this population, OS correlated with the depth of response (P < .0001) and favorable interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization profile (P < .001). CTDa was associated with higher rates of thromboembolic events, constipation, infection, and neuropathy than MP. In elderly patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (median age, 73 years), CTDa produced higher response rates than MP but was not associated with improved survival outcomes. We highlight the importance of cytogenetic profiling at diagnosis and effective management of adverse events. This trial was registered at International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number as #68454111.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 0006-4971 (print)
1528-0020 (electronic)
Related URLs:
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH426 Genetics
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine > Human Development and Health
ePrint ID: 337721
Date Deposited: 02 May 2012 14:38
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 20:21
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/337721

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