Does maternal long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid status in pregnancy influence the bone health of children?


Harvey, N., Dhanwal, D., Robinson, S., Kim, M., Inskip, H., Godfrey, K., Dennison, E., Calder, P., Cooper, C. and SWS Study Group (2012) Does maternal long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid status in pregnancy influence the bone health of children? Osteoporosis International, 23, (9), 2359-2367. (doi:10.1007/s00198-011-1860-2). (PMID:22159749).

Download

Full text not available from this repository.

Description/Abstract

In this large, population-based, prospective, mother-offspring cohort study, maternal long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) status during pregnancy was found to be positively associated with bone mass in the offspring at age 4 years. The findings suggest that variation in intrauterine exposure to n-3 and n-6 LCPUFAs may have potential consequences for skeletal development.

Introduction: Maternal diet in pregnancy has been linked to childhood bone mass, but the mechanisms and nutrients involved are uncertain. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) have been shown to affect bone metabolism, but the relationship between maternal fatty acid status and bone mass in the offspring remains unknown.

Methods: We evaluated the association between maternal LCPUFA status in late pregnancy (34 weeks gestation) and bone density in their children at age 4 years within 727 mother-child pairs taking part in the Southampton Women's Survey.

Results: Concentrations of the n-3 LCPUFA component of maternal plasma phosphatidylcholine were positively associated with a number of bone mineral measures at the age of 4 years; these associations persisted after adjustment for maternal body build, walking speed and infant feeding. Relationships were most evident for eicosapentaenoic acid (r = 0.09, p = 0.02 for whole body areal bone mineral density [aBMD] and r = 0.1, p = 0.008 for lumbar spine aBMD) and for docosapentaenoic acid (r = 0.09, p = 0.02 for whole body aBMD and r = 0.12, p = 0.002 for lumbar spine aBMD).

Conclusions: These findings suggest that variation in early exposure to n-3 and n-6 LCPUFA may have potential consequences for bone development and that the effects appear to persist into early childhood.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 0937-941X (print)
1433-2965 (electronic)
Keywords: bone mass, development, epidemiology, nutrition, osteoporosis
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine
ePrint ID: 338813
Date Deposited: 17 May 2012 12:33
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 20:21
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/338813

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item