Global proteomic analysis of the insoluble, soluble, and supernatant fractions of the psychrophilic archaeon Methanococcoides burtonii. Part I: the effect of growth temperature


Williams, Timothy J., Burg, Dominic W., Raftery, Mark J., Poljak, Anne, Guilhaus, Michael, Pilak, Oliver and Cavicchioli, Ricardo (2010) Global proteomic analysis of the insoluble, soluble, and supernatant fractions of the psychrophilic archaeon Methanococcoides burtonii. Part I: the effect of growth temperature. Journal of Proteome Research, 9, (2), 640-652. (doi:10.1021/pr900509n). (PMID:20039705).

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Description/Abstract

The response of the cold-adapted (psychrophilic) methanogenic archaeon Methanococcoides burtonii to growth temperature was investigated using differential proteomics (postincorporation isobaric labeling) and tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/LC-MS/MS). This is the first proteomic study of M. burtonii to include techniques that specifically enrich for both surface and membrane proteins and to assess the effects of growth temperature (4 vs 23 degrees C) and carbon source (trimethylamine vs methanol) on cellular protein levels. Numerous surface layer proteins were more abundant at 4 degrees C, indicating an extensive remodeling of the cell envelope in response to low temperature. Many of these surface proteins contain domains associated with cell adhesion. Within the cell, small proteins each composed of a single TRAM domain were recovered as important cold adaptation proteins and might serve as RNA chaperones, in an analogous manner to Csp proteins (absent from M. burtonii). Other proteins that had higher abundances at 4 degrees C can be similarly tied to relieving or resolving the adverse affects of cold growth temperature on translational capacity and correct protein folding. The proteome of M. burtonii grown at 23 degrees C was dominated by oxidative stress proteins, as well as a large number of integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This is the first truly global proteomic study of a psychrophilic archaeon and greatly expands knowledge of the cellular mechanisms underpinning cold adaptation in the Archaea.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 1535-3893 (print)
1535-3907 (electronic)
Subjects: Q Science > QD Chemistry
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine > Biomedical Research Facility
Faculty of Natural and Environmental Sciences > Biological Sciences > Molecular & Cellular
ePrint ID: 338909
Date Deposited: 18 May 2012 13:25
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 20:21
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/338909

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