Distance threshold for the effect of urban agriculture on elevated self-reported malaria prevalence in Accra, Ghana


Stoler, Justin, Weeks, John R., Getis, Arthur and Hill, Allan G. (2009) Distance threshold for the effect of urban agriculture on elevated self-reported malaria prevalence in Accra, Ghana. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 80, (4), 547-554. (PMID:18298857).

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Description/Abstract

Irrigated urban agriculture (UA), which has helped alleviate poverty and increase food security in rapidly urbanizing sub-Saharan Africa, may inadvertently support malaria vectors. Previous studies have not identified a variable distance effect on malaria prevalence from UA. This study examines the relationships between self-reported malaria information for 3,164 women surveyed in Accra, Ghana, in 2003, and both household characteristics and proximity to sites of UA. Malaria self-reports are associated with age, education, overall health, socioeconomic status, and solid waste disposal method. The odds of self-reported malaria are significantly higher for women living within 1 km of UA compared with all women living near an irrigation source, the association disappearing beyond this critical distance. Malaria prevalence is often elevated in communities within 1 km of UA despite more favorable socio-economic characteristics than communities beyond 1 km. Neighborhoods within 1 km of UA should be reconsidered as a priority for malaria-related care.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 0002-9637 (print)
Related URLs:
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
Divisions: Faculty of Social and Human Sciences > Social Sciences > Social Statistics & Demography
ePrint ID: 340399
Date Deposited: 20 Jun 2012 14:29
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 20:22
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/340399

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