A comparison of power output from linear and non-linear kinetic energy harvesters using real vibration data


Beeby, S.P., Wang, Leran, Zhu, Dibin, Weddell, Alex, Merrett, Geoff V., Stark, Bernard, Szarka, Gyorgy and Al-Hashimi, Bashir M. (2013) A comparison of power output from linear and non-linear kinetic energy harvesters using real vibration data. Smart Materials and Structures, 22, (7), 075022. (doi:10.1088/0964-1726/22/7/075022).

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Description/Abstract

The design of vibration energy harvesters (VEHs) is highly dependent upon the characteristics of the environmental vibrations present in the intended application. VEHs can be linear resonant systems tuned to particular frequencies or non-linear systems with either bi-stable operation or a Duffing-type response. This paper provides detailed vibration data from a range of applications, which has been made freely available for download through the Energy Harvesting Network’s online data repository. In particular, this research shows that simulation is essential in designing and selecting the most suitable vibration energy harvester for particular applications. This is illustrated through C-based simulations of different types of VEHs, using real vibration data from a diesel ferry engine, a combined heat and power pump, a petrol car engine and a helicopter. The analysis shows that a bistable energy harvester only has a higher output power than a linear or Duffing-type nonlinear energy harvester with the same Q-factor when it is subjected to white noise vibration. The analysis also indicates that piezoelectric transduction mechanisms are more suitable for bistable energy harvesters than electromagnetic transduction. Furthermore, the linear energy harvester has a higher output power compared to the Duffing-type nonlinear energy harvester with the same Q factor in most cases. The Duffing-type nonlinear energy harvester can generate more power than the linear energy harvester only when it is excited at vibrations with multiple peaks and the frequencies of these peaks are within its bandwidth. Through these new observations, this paper illustrates the importance of simulation in the design of energy harvesting systems, with particular emphasis on the need to incorporate real vibration data.

Item Type: Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): doi:10.1088/0964-1726/22/7/075022
ISSNs: 0964-1726 (print)
1361-665X (electronic)
Subjects: Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA75 Electronic computers. Computer science
Q Science > QC Physics
T Technology > TK Electrical engineering. Electronics Nuclear engineering
Divisions : Faculty of Physical Sciences and Engineering > Electronics and Computer Science > EEE
Faculty of Physical Sciences and Engineering > Electronics and Computer Science > Electronic & Software Systems
ePrint ID: 353586
Accepted Date and Publication Date:
Status
July 2013Published
7 June 2013Made publicly available
Date Deposited: 11 Jun 2013 10:39
Last Modified: 13 May 2016 16:34
Projects:
Next Generation Energy-Harvesting Electronics - holistic approach 1763
Funded by: EPSRC (EP/G067740/1)
Led by: Bashir M. Al-Hashimi
1 October 2009 to 31 March 2013
Further Information:Google Scholar
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/353586

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