The cognitive behavioural model of irritable bowel syndrome: a prospective investigation of gastroenteritis patients.


Spence, Meagan J. and Moss-Morris, Rona (2007) The cognitive behavioural model of irritable bowel syndrome: a prospective investigation of gastroenteritis patients. Gut, 56, (8), 1066-1071. (doi:10.1136/gut.2006.108811).

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Original Publication URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gut.2006.108811

Description/Abstract

Background and aims: The aim of this study was to determine whether a combination of mood and personality factors together with illness beliefs and behaviours predict the onset of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) post gastroenteritis, as suggested by the cognitive behavioural model of IBS.

Methods: Primary care patients with a positive test for Campylobacter gastroenteritis, and no previous history of IBS or serious bowel conditions were recruited into this prospective study (N=620). Participants completed a questionnaire at the time of infection which included standardised measures of mood, perceived stress, perfectionism, negative illness beliefs and illness behaviours. 3 and 6 months after initial infection, participants completed follow-up questionnaires designed to determine whether they met Rome criteria for IBS.

Results: A total of 49 participants met criteria for IBS at both follow-up points. Logistic regressions indicated that those who developed IBS had significantly higher levels of perceived stress (1.10 [95%CI, 1.02- 1.15]), anxiety (1.14 [95%CI, 1.05-1.23]), somatisation, (1.17 [95%CI, 1.02-1.35]), and negative illness beliefs (1.14 [95%CI, 1.03-1.27]) at the time of infection than those who did not develop IBS. IBS cases were also significantly more likely to remain active in the face of their acute symptoms until they felt forced to rest (all-or-nothing behaviour) (1.09 [95%CI, 1.03-1.16]), and significantly less likely to initially rest in response to their acute illness (0.93 [95%CI, .88- .97]). Depression and perfectionism were not associated with IBS onset.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 0017-5749 (print)
Related URLs:
Keywords: biopsychosocial, campylobacter gastroenteritis, cognitive behavioural, functional somatic syndromes, irritable bowel syndrome
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Psychology > Division of Human Wellbeing
ePrint ID: 44799
Date Deposited: 15 Mar 2007
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 18:29
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/44799

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