Evidence for an extreme climatic event on Achill Island, Co. Mayo, Ireland around 5200-5100 cal. yr BP


Caseldine, C., Thompson, G., Langdon, C. and Hendon, D. (2005) Evidence for an extreme climatic event on Achill Island, Co. Mayo, Ireland around 5200-5100 cal. yr BP. Journal of Quaternary Science, 20, (2), 169-178. (doi:10.1002/jqs.901).

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Original Publication URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jqs.901

Description/Abstract

A range of detailed palaeoenvironmental analyses carried out on a series of three peat profiles from Achill Island, Co. Mayo, western Ireland, reveal evidence for an extreme climatic event, probably a storm or series of storms, around 5200-5100 cal. yr BP that caused the deposition of an extensive layer of silt across blanket peat. This event followed a period of relatively dry climate during which Neolithic communities expanded in the region. There was a subsequent period of continuing dry conditions allowing extensive colonisation of the peat by Pinus before a shift to wetter conditions characteristic of the later Holocene. The extreme climatic event is possibly linked to human abandonment of the area comparable to that observed from the work on the internationally significant Céide Fields in the same region.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Key evidence is provided for a dry period preceding a time of severe storminess around 5200 cal. yr BP found in very few palaeoecological records. This is probably linked to human abandonment of the area comparable to internationally significant Céide Fields in the same region. Provided most of the data.
ISSNs: 0267-8179 (print)
Related URLs:
Keywords: peat humification, extreme event, ireland, palaeoclimate, neolithic
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GB Physical geography
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Geography > Environmental Processes and Change
ePrint ID: 46638
Date Deposited: 13 Jul 2007
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 18:30
Contact Email Address: c.j.caseldine@exeter.ac.uk
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/46638

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