The effect of methylphenidate on response inhibition and the event-related potential of chilren with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder


Broyd, S.J., Johnstone, S.J., Barry, R.J., Clarke, A.R., McCarthy, R., Selikowitz, M. and Lawrence, C.A. (2005) The effect of methylphenidate on response inhibition and the event-related potential of chilren with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 58, (1), 47-58. (doi:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2005.03.008).

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Description/Abstract

Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) appear to be deficient in inhibitory processes, as reflected in behavioural and electrophysiological measures. This study examined the effect of methylphenidate (MPH) on response inhibition in children with AD/HD. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and skin conductance level (SCL) were recorded from 18 boys with AD/HD and 18 controls while they performed a cued Go/Nogo task with 70% Go probability. All participants performed the task twice, with an hour interval between test sessions. At the beginning of this interval children with AD/HD took their normal morning dose of MPH. The AD/HD group showed lower SCL than controls pre-medication, a difference not found subsequent to the administration of MPH. While the AD/HD group made more overall errors (omission + commission) pre-medication, and continued to make more omission errors than controls post-medication, the groups became comparable on the number of commission errors, suggesting MPH ameliorates deficits in response inhibition. Children with AD/HD displayed enhanced N1 and P2 amplitudes, and reduced N2 amplitudes relative to controls. These differences were not significant post-medication, at least partly attributable to the action of MPH. This study is unusual in the concurrent examination of electrodermal and electrophysiological measures of medication effects in children with AD/HD, with the retesting of both the AD/HD and control groups allowing a more valid estimate of the effects of medication, rather than assuming that retesting does not have a substantial impact.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 0167-8760 (print)
Related URLs:
Keywords: ad/hd, event-related potential, inhibition, methylphenidate, skin conductance level
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Psychology
ePrint ID: 48223
Date Deposited: 06 Sep 2007
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 18:31
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/48223

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