Buying on the Internet: gender differences in on-line and conventional buying motivations

Dittmar, Helga, Long, Karen and Meek, Rosie (2004) Buying on the Internet: gender differences in on-line and conventional buying motivations. Sex Roles, 50, (5-6), 423-444. (doi:10.1023/B:SERS.0000018896.35251.c7).


Full text not available from this repository.


Two studies are reported that examine gender differences in attitudes toward conventional buying and on-line buying. Thematic analysis of open-ended accounts (n=113) in Study 1 provides a rich, qualitative map of buying attitude dimensions that are important to young women and men. Study 2 is a quantitative survey (n=240) of functional, emotional–social, and identity-related buying motivations in the 2 environments. The on-line environment has an effect on buying attitudes, but more strongly so for women than for men. Whereas men's functional concerns are amplified—rather than changed—in the shift from conventional to on-line buying, women's motivational priorities show a reversal, and less involvement in shopping. In contrast to men, women's on-line buying is associated with barriers (social–experiential factors) and facilitators (efficiency, identity-related concerns) grounded in their attitudes toward conventional buying. This has implications for the ease with which women and men can and want to adapt to the accelerating shift toward computer-mediated shopping.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 0360-0025 (print)
Keywords: internet and gender, buying motivations, buying on-line
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HF Commerce
H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA75 Electronic computers. Computer science
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Social Sciences > Sociology and Social Policy
ePrint ID: 51860
Date Deposited: 03 Jun 2008
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 18:35

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item