The association of oestrogen receptor alpha-haplotypes with cardiovascular risk factors in the British Women's Heart and Health Study


Lawlor, Debbie A., Timpson, Nick, Ebrahim, Shah, Day, Ian N.M. and Smith, George Davey (2006) The association of oestrogen receptor alpha-haplotypes with cardiovascular risk factors in the British Women's Heart and Health Study. European Heart Journal, 27, (13), 1597-1604. (doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehi833).

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Original Publication URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehi833

Description/Abstract

Aims One previous study among women with established coronary heart disease found a gene–treatment interaction between the oestrogen receptor gene (ESR1) and hormone replacement in their association with high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c). We aimed to replicate these findings in a general population sample.

Methods and results Cross-sectional associations were assessed in a study of 3404 women from 23 towns across Britain who were aged 60–79 at the time of assessment and were described as white by the examining nurse. Women with the T-A haplotype [constructed from two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the first intron of ESR1: c454-397T>C (rs2234693) and c454-351A>G (rs9340799)], which was predicted to be associated with reduced oestrogen response, were more likely to have been past [per haplotype odds ratio 1.16 (95% CI 1.01, 1.33), P = 0.02] or to be current users [per haplotype odds ratio 1.19 (95% CI 0.99, 1.42), P = 0.05] of hormone replacement. However, there was no association between haplotype or either SNP and HDL-c or other cardiovascular disease risk factors and no statistical evidence of an interaction between hormone replacement use and haplotype or either SNP with respect to HDL-c or any other cardiovascular disease risk factors.

Conclusion Women with the T-A haplotype are more likely to use hormone replacement. However, genotyping of ESR1 rs2234693 or rs9340799 in post-menopausal women to tailor hormone replacement is unlikely to markedly improve cardiovascular risk.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 0195668 (print)
Related URLs:
Keywords: cholesterol, cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance, hormone replacement therapy, risk factors,aged, methods, research, metabolism, time, humans, genotype, research support
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
R Medicine > RB Pathology
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH426 Genetics
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Medicine > Human Genetics
ePrint ID: 59971
Date Deposited: 05 Sep 2008
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 18:42
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/59971

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