A randomised controlled trial of a cognitive behavioural therapy based self-management intervention for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in primary care.


Moss-Morris, R., Bogalo, L., Didsbury, L.P. and Spence, M.J. (2010) A randomised controlled trial of a cognitive behavioural therapy based self-management intervention for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in primary care. Psychological Medicine, 40, (1), 85-94. (doi:10.1017/S0033291709990195).

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Description/Abstract

Background: recent guidelines for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) emphasize the need for research to facilitate home-based self-management for these patients in primary care. The aim of the current study was to test the efficacy of a manualized cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)-based self-management programme for IBS in a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT).

Method: sixty-four primary-care patients meeting Rome criteria for IBS were randomized into either self-management plus treatment as usual (TAU) (n=31) or a TAU control condition (n=33). The self-management condition included a structured 7-week manualized programme that was self-administered in conjunction with a 1-hour face-to-face therapy session and two 1-hour telephone sessions. The primary outcome measures were the Subject's Global Assessment (SGA) of Relief and the Irritable Bowel Syndrome Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS) assessed at baseline, end of treatment (2 months), and 3 and 6 months post-treatment.

Results: analysis was by intention-to-treat. Twenty-three (76.7%) of the self-management group rated themselves as experiencing symptom relief across all three time periods compared to seven (21.2%) of the TAU controls [odds ratio (OR) 12.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.72–40.1]. At 8 months, 25 (83%) of the self-management group showed a clinically significant change on the IBS-SSS compared to 16 (49%) of the control group (OR 5.3, 95% CI 1.64–17.26).

Conclusions: this study provides preliminary evidence that CBT-based self-management in the form of a structured manual and minimal therapist contact is an effective and acceptable form of treatment for primary-care IBS patients.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 0033-2917 (print)
Related URLs:
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Psychology > Division of Human Wellbeing
ePrint ID: 66887
Date Deposited: 30 Jul 2009
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 18:48
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/66887

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