Women in No Man's Land: English recluses and the development of vernacular literature in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries


Millett, Bella (1997) Women in No Man's Land: English recluses and the development of vernacular literature in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. In, Meale, Carol M. (ed.) Women and Literature in Britain, 1150-1500 [2nd edition]. Cambridge, UK, Cambridge University Press, 86-103. (Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature 17).

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Description/Abstract

'Throughout the Middle Ages, it was more usual for vernacular works to be listened to than read, and we cannot always be sure that either lay patrons or nuns read the works that were written for them rather than hearing them read aloud by someone else; but recluses by definition were solitary readers, and this is sometimes reflected in the works that were provided for their use. In the texts produced for recluses in [the twelfth and thirteenth centuries], we see not only the recording in writing of works originally intended for oral delivery, but the development of something still closer to our modern concept of "literature", vernacular works composed with readers rather than hearers in mind.'

Item Type: Book Section
ISBNs: 0521576202 (paperback)
9780521576208 (paperback)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BR Christianity
P Language and Literature > PR English literature
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Humanities > English
ePrint ID: 67600
Date Deposited: 28 Aug 2009
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 18:48
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/67600

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