Maternal high-fat diet: effects on offspring bone structure


Lanham, S.A., Roberts, C., Hollingworth, T., Sreekumar, R., Elahi, M.M., Cagampang, F.R., Hanson, M.A. and Oreffo, R.O.C. (2009) Maternal high-fat diet: effects on offspring bone structure. Osteoporosis International, 1-12. (doi:10.1007/s00198-009-1118-4).

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Description/Abstract

Summary: peak bone mass is believed to partly be programmed in utero. Mouse dams and offspring were given a high-fat diet and offspring studied as adults. Female offspring from high-fat dams exhibited altered trabecular structure indicative of in utero programming. In utero nutrition has consequences in later life.

Introduction: epidemiological studies suggest that skeletal growth is programmed during intrauterine and early postnatal life. We hypothesise that development of optimal peak bone mass has, in part, a foetal origin and investigated this using a mouse model of maternal dietary fat excess.

Methods: offspring from mouse dams fed either standard chow (C) or lifetime high-fat diet (HF) were maintained on a HF diet to adulthood. Femur samples were taken at 30 weeks of age and bone structure, adiposity and strength analysed. Sample sizes were four to six for each sex and each diet group.

Results: offspring from HF-fed dams showed increased adiposity in the femur in comparison to offspring from C-fed dams. Female offspring from HF dams exhibited altered trabecular structure indicative of in utero programming.

Conclusions: a maternal HF diet during pregnancy increases bone marrow adiposity and alters bone structure in their offspring.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 0937-941X (print)
Related URLs:
Keywords: in utero, micro-computed tomography, programming, structure
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Medicine > Developmental Origins of Health and Disease
ePrint ID: 72617
Date Deposited: 18 Feb 2010
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 18:51
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/72617

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