UK Renal registry 11th annual report, chapter 7 survival and causes of death of UK adults patients on renal replacement therapy in 2007: national and centre-specific analyses


Ansell, David, Roderick, Paul, Hodsman, Alex, Ford, Daniel, Steenkamp, Retha and Tomson, Charlie (2009) UK Renal registry 11th annual report, chapter 7 survival and causes of death of UK adults patients on renal replacement therapy in 2007: national and centre-specific analyses. Nephron Clinical Practice, 111, (Supplement 1), C113-C139. (doi:10.1159/000209996).

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Original Publication URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000209996

Description/Abstract

Introduction: these analyses examine survival from the start of renal replacement therapy (RRT), based on the total incident UK dialysis population reported to the Registry, including the 21% who started on PD and the 5% who received a pre-emptive transplant. Survival of prevalent patients and changes in survival between 1997-2006 are reported. The article includes a discussion on the technical definition for the date of start of both PD and HD.

Methods: survival was calculated for both incident and prevalent patients on RRT and compared between the UK countries after adjustment for age. Survival of incident patients (starting during 2006) was calculated with and without a 90 day RRT start cut off. Survival of incident patients is shown with and without censoring at transplantation. Both the Kaplan-Meier and Cox adjusted models were used to calculate survival. Causes of death were analysed for both groups. Relative risk of death was calculated compared with the general UK population.

Results: the 2006 unadjusted 1 year after 90 day survival for patients starting RRT was 86%. In incident 18-64 year olds the unadjusted 1 year survival had risen from 85.9% in 1997 to 91.5% in 2006 and for those aged ges 65 it had risen from 63.8% to 72.9%. The age adjusted survival of prevalent dialysis patients rose from 85% in 2000 to 89% in 2007. Diabetic patient survival rose from 76.6% in 2000 to 84.0% in 2007. The relative risk of death on RRT compared with the general population was 30 at age 30 years compared with 3 at age 80 years. In the prevalent RRT dialysis population, cardiovascular disease accounted for 34% of deaths, infection 20% and treatment withdrawal 14%.

Conclusions: incident and prevalent patient survival on RRT in all the UK countries for all age ranges and also for patients with diabetes continued to improve. The relative risk of death on RRT compared with the general population has fallen since 2001. Death rates on dialysis in the UK remained lower than when compared with a similar aged population on dialysis in the USA

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 1660-8151 (print)
Related URLs:
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Medicine > Community Clinical Sciences
ePrint ID: 72939
Date Deposited: 25 Feb 2010
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 18:52
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/72939

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