Asherman syndrome--one century later


Yu, Dan, Wong, Yat-May, Cheong, Ying, Xia, Enlan and Li, Tin-Chiu (2008) Asherman syndrome--one century later. Fertility and Sterility, 89, (4), 759-779. (doi:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2008.02.096).

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Description/Abstract

Objective: To provide an update on the current knowledge of Asherman syndrome.

Design:

Literature review.

Setting:

The worldwide reports of this disease.

Patient(s):

Patients with Asherman syndrome who presented with amenorrhea or hypomenorrhea, infertility, or recurrent pregnancy loss.

Intervention(s):

Hysteroscopy and hysteroscopic surgery have been the gold standard of diagnosis and treatment respectively for this condition.

Main outcome measure(s):

The etiology, pathology, symptomatology, diagnosis, treatment, and reproductive outcomes were analyzed.

Result(s):

This syndrome occurs mainly as a result of trauma to the gravid uterine cavity, which leads to the formation of intrauterine and/or intracervical adhesions. Despite the advances in hysteroscopic surgery, the treatment of moderate to severe Asherman syndrome still presents a challenge. Furthermore, pregnancy after treatment remains high risk with complications including spontaneous abortion, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, placenta accrete or praevia, or even uterine rupture.

Conclusion(s):

The management of moderate to severe disease still poses a challenge, and the prognosis of severe disease remains poor. Close antenatal surveillance and monitoring are necessary for women who conceive after treatment.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: PMID: 18406834 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
ISSNs: 0015-0282 (print)
Related URLs:
Keywords: Intrauterine adhesion, asherman syndrome, hysteroscopic adhesiolysis, infertility, synechia, hysteroscopy, amenorrhea
Subjects: R Medicine > RG Gynecology and obstetrics
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Medicine > Developmental Origins of Health and Disease
ePrint ID: 76224
Date Deposited: 15 Mar 2010
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 18:55
Contact Email Address: Y.Cheong@soton.ac.uk
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/76224

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