T cell receptor V beta expression in human intestine: regional variation in postnatal intestine and biased usage in fetal gut


Thomas, R., Schurmann, G., Lionetti, P., Pender, S.L.F. and MacDonald, T.T. (1996) T cell receptor V beta expression in human intestine: regional variation in postnatal intestine and biased usage in fetal gut. Gut, 38, (2), 190-195. (doi:10.1136/gut.38.2.190 ).

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Description/Abstract

A panel of T cell receptor V beta specific monoclonal antibodies was used to analyse V beta gene usage at different sites in human postnatal and fetal intestine. In normal small intestine, at a single site, different patients showed expansion of T cells expressing individual V beta s. Lamina propria and epithelial T cells from the same patient showed overlapping but not identical V beta dominance. V beta dominance was also shown in the T cells of the colonic lamina propria. Analysis of two separate regions of intestine from the same patient (5-100 cm apart) showed that T cells expressing a dominant V beta region were often present at both sites. In most patients, however, major biases in T cell V beta usage (two to 12-fold variation) were also apparent between the two sites. Analysis of V beta expression in human fetal intestine also showed considerable skewing, although the most common dominant V beta in postnatal intestine (V beta 22) was never predominant in fetal intestine. Patchy local variation in the expression of individual V beta s therefore occurs against a background of V beta dominance over large regions of the human gut. Furthermore the results from fetal gut show that factors other than luminal antigen control V beta expression in the gut.

Item Type: Article
ISSNs: 1468-3288 (electronic)
Related URLs:
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Divisions: University Structure - Pre August 2011 > School of Medicine > Infection, Inflammation and Repair
ePrint ID: 79332
Date Deposited: 11 Mar 2010
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2014 19:01
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/79332

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