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A model for ground vibration from railway tunnels

A model for ground vibration from railway tunnels
A model for ground vibration from railway tunnels
Trains give rise to vibration which propagates through the ground to nearby buildings. At low frequencies (about 4–80 Hz) ‘whole body’ vibration is generated which may be felt, while at higher frequencies (about 30–200 Hz) a rumbling sound is radiated from vibrating walls and floors into the rooms of buildings. Low-frequency vibration is primarily associated with heavy axle-load freight trains running on lines on the ground surface. Structure-borne noise is most often perceptible from trains running in cut-and-cover or bored tunnels where the direct airborne sound of the train is absent at the receiver. For either phenomenon, numerical models for the transmission of vibration through the ground are required to predict the effect of structural alterations to cuttings, embankments and tunnels, or of foundation engineering. To address this, a coupled boundary element/finite element model for vibration propagation has been developed. By restricting analysis to two dimensions, trend analysis can be performed with models that require much lower computing resources than would be required for three dimensions. Here the method is applied to study the effect of design alterations of a bored tunnel and a cut-and-cover tunnel on the transmission of vibration for a frequency range up to 200 Hz.
mathematical modelling/railway, systems/tunnels, tunnelling
0965-092X
121-129
Jones, C.J.C.
695ac86c-2915-420c-ac72-3a86f98d3301
Thompson, D.J.
bca37fd3-d692-4779-b663-5916b01edae5
Petyt, M.
741e8047-ace8-4003-b338-7e998d0303e5
Jones, C.J.C.
695ac86c-2915-420c-ac72-3a86f98d3301
Thompson, D.J.
bca37fd3-d692-4779-b663-5916b01edae5
Petyt, M.
741e8047-ace8-4003-b338-7e998d0303e5

Jones, C.J.C., Thompson, D.J. and Petyt, M. (2002) A model for ground vibration from railway tunnels. Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Transport, 153 (2), 121-129. (doi:10.1680/tran.153.2.121.38918).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Trains give rise to vibration which propagates through the ground to nearby buildings. At low frequencies (about 4–80 Hz) ‘whole body’ vibration is generated which may be felt, while at higher frequencies (about 30–200 Hz) a rumbling sound is radiated from vibrating walls and floors into the rooms of buildings. Low-frequency vibration is primarily associated with heavy axle-load freight trains running on lines on the ground surface. Structure-borne noise is most often perceptible from trains running in cut-and-cover or bored tunnels where the direct airborne sound of the train is absent at the receiver. For either phenomenon, numerical models for the transmission of vibration through the ground are required to predict the effect of structural alterations to cuttings, embankments and tunnels, or of foundation engineering. To address this, a coupled boundary element/finite element model for vibration propagation has been developed. By restricting analysis to two dimensions, trend analysis can be performed with models that require much lower computing resources than would be required for three dimensions. Here the method is applied to study the effect of design alterations of a bored tunnel and a cut-and-cover tunnel on the transmission of vibration for a frequency range up to 200 Hz.

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More information

Published date: 2002
Keywords: mathematical modelling/railway, systems/tunnels, tunnelling

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 10030
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/10030
ISSN: 0965-092X
PURE UUID: 4a7de8af-580a-486c-872e-8b00070f6f61
ORCID for D.J. Thompson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7964-5906

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Jan 2005
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:59

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Contributors

Author: C.J.C. Jones
Author: D.J. Thompson ORCID iD
Author: M. Petyt

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