The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Difference thresholds for intensity perception of whole-body vertical vibration: effect of frequency and magnitude

Difference thresholds for intensity perception of whole-body vertical vibration: effect of frequency and magnitude
Difference thresholds for intensity perception of whole-body vertical vibration: effect of frequency and magnitude
Difference thresholds for seated subjects exposed to whole-body vertical sinusoidal vibration have been determined at two vibration magnitudes [0.1 and 0.5 ms–2 root mean square (r.m.s.)] and at two frequencies (5 and 20 Hz). For 12 subjects, difference thresholds were determined using the up-and-down transformed response method based on two-interval forced-choice tracking. At both frequencies, the difference thresholds increased by a factor of five when the magnitude of the vibration increased from 0.1 to 0.5 ms–2 r.m.s. The median relative difference thresholds, Weber fractions (I/I), expressed as percentages, were about 10% and did not differ significantly between the two vibration magnitudes or the two frequencies. It is concluded that for the conditions investigated the difference thresholds for whole-body vibration are approximately consistent with Weber's Law. A vibration magnitude will need to be reduced by more than about 10% for the change to be detectable by human subjects; vibration measurements will be required to detect reductions of less than 10%.
vibrations, psychology, biomechanics
0001-4966
620-624
Morioka, M.
ff0eb643-30be-4a9b-aa66-9bd39698c9b5
Griffin, M.J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Morioka, M.
ff0eb643-30be-4a9b-aa66-9bd39698c9b5
Griffin, M.J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Morioka, M. and Griffin, M.J. (2000) Difference thresholds for intensity perception of whole-body vertical vibration: effect of frequency and magnitude. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 107 (1), 620-624. (doi:10.1121/1.428331).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Difference thresholds for seated subjects exposed to whole-body vertical sinusoidal vibration have been determined at two vibration magnitudes [0.1 and 0.5 ms–2 root mean square (r.m.s.)] and at two frequencies (5 and 20 Hz). For 12 subjects, difference thresholds were determined using the up-and-down transformed response method based on two-interval forced-choice tracking. At both frequencies, the difference thresholds increased by a factor of five when the magnitude of the vibration increased from 0.1 to 0.5 ms–2 r.m.s. The median relative difference thresholds, Weber fractions (I/I), expressed as percentages, were about 10% and did not differ significantly between the two vibration magnitudes or the two frequencies. It is concluded that for the conditions investigated the difference thresholds for whole-body vibration are approximately consistent with Weber's Law. A vibration magnitude will need to be reduced by more than about 10% for the change to be detectable by human subjects; vibration measurements will be required to detect reductions of less than 10%.

Text
12571 MM-MJG 2000 WBV Difference Thresholds - AUTHOR ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT - Accepted Manuscript
Download (791kB)

More information

Published date: 2000
Keywords: vibrations, psychology, biomechanics
Organisations: Human Sciences Group, Inst. Sound & Vibration Research, Southampton Marine & Maritime Institute

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 10521
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/10521
ISSN: 0001-4966
PURE UUID: 5cf09758-fb23-400d-9908-913e2342e9ff
ORCID for M.J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Aug 2005
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:47

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×