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Neurophysiological correlates of error correction in sensorimotor-synchronization

Neurophysiological correlates of error correction in sensorimotor-synchronization
Neurophysiological correlates of error correction in sensorimotor-synchronization
In a sensorimotor synchronization task requiring subjects to tap in synchrony with an auditory stimulus, occasional perturbations (i.e., interval changes) in an otherwise isochronous sequence of auditory metronome stimuli are known to be compensated remarkably swift and with surprising precision, even when they are too small to be consciously perceived. To investigate the neural substrate and the informational basis of error correction in sensorimotor synchronization, we recorded movement-related, auditory-evoked, and error-related EEG potentials. Experiment 1 confirmed rapid adjustment to stimulus phase shifts, with faster correction of large (50 ms) compared to small (15 ms) shifts. In addition to being corrected faster, there was overcorrection of the 50 ms shifts, attributed to engagement of period correction mechanisms. For +50 ms shifts, a neural correlate of period correction was identified in the form of medial frontal cortex activation, preceded by an error-related brain potential (ERN). Auditory-evoked potential (AEP) amplitudes were sensitive to stimulus phase shifts of both large and small magnitude. Further experiments with a smaller magnitude 10 ms phase shift (Experiment 2) and passive auditory stimulation (Experiment 3) provided evidence that the modulation of AEP amplitudes is not due to metronome interval changes, but may represent auditory-somatosensory activation. Together, behavioral and neurophysiological data support the hypothesis that phase correction is a largely automatic process, not dependent on conscious perception of changes in timing. By contrast, perceivable phase shifts may invoke timekeeper adjustments accompanied by medial frontal cortex activity.
1283-1297
Praamstra, P.
5e90386c-1700-4216-bae8-90e9dc4a2189
Turgeon, M.
735e224c-9846-4d5a-a057-c26629b857d2
Hesse, C.W.
53fee7f7-a12e-4783-a426-0d59afbf475d
Wing, A.M.
4e7867cc-6705-4444-9cd9-b52028e6a0b5
Perryer, L.
4a49d436-3186-420c-b60c-c5067f1127c2
Praamstra, P.
5e90386c-1700-4216-bae8-90e9dc4a2189
Turgeon, M.
735e224c-9846-4d5a-a057-c26629b857d2
Hesse, C.W.
53fee7f7-a12e-4783-a426-0d59afbf475d
Wing, A.M.
4e7867cc-6705-4444-9cd9-b52028e6a0b5
Perryer, L.
4a49d436-3186-420c-b60c-c5067f1127c2

Praamstra, P., Turgeon, M., Hesse, C.W., Wing, A.M. and Perryer, L. (2003) Neurophysiological correlates of error correction in sensorimotor-synchronization. NeuroImage, 20 (2), 1283-1297. (doi:10.1016/S1053-8119(03)00351-3).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In a sensorimotor synchronization task requiring subjects to tap in synchrony with an auditory stimulus, occasional perturbations (i.e., interval changes) in an otherwise isochronous sequence of auditory metronome stimuli are known to be compensated remarkably swift and with surprising precision, even when they are too small to be consciously perceived. To investigate the neural substrate and the informational basis of error correction in sensorimotor synchronization, we recorded movement-related, auditory-evoked, and error-related EEG potentials. Experiment 1 confirmed rapid adjustment to stimulus phase shifts, with faster correction of large (50 ms) compared to small (15 ms) shifts. In addition to being corrected faster, there was overcorrection of the 50 ms shifts, attributed to engagement of period correction mechanisms. For +50 ms shifts, a neural correlate of period correction was identified in the form of medial frontal cortex activation, preceded by an error-related brain potential (ERN). Auditory-evoked potential (AEP) amplitudes were sensitive to stimulus phase shifts of both large and small magnitude. Further experiments with a smaller magnitude 10 ms phase shift (Experiment 2) and passive auditory stimulation (Experiment 3) provided evidence that the modulation of AEP amplitudes is not due to metronome interval changes, but may represent auditory-somatosensory activation. Together, behavioral and neurophysiological data support the hypothesis that phase correction is a largely automatic process, not dependent on conscious perception of changes in timing. By contrast, perceivable phase shifts may invoke timekeeper adjustments accompanied by medial frontal cortex activity.

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Published date: 2003

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 10973
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/10973
PURE UUID: 9fd834dd-8021-45ef-88dd-f260864a417e

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Date deposited: 13 Jun 2005
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 17:05

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