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Storm induced convective transport of suspended matter during a spring bloom in the northeast Atlantic Ocean

Storm induced convective transport of suspended matter during a spring bloom in the northeast Atlantic Ocean
Storm induced convective transport of suspended matter during a spring bloom in the northeast Atlantic Ocean
Observations during a spring phytoplankton bloom in the northeast Atlantic between March and May 1992 in the Biotrans region at 47°N, 20°W, are presented. During most of the observation period there was a positive heat flux into the ocean, winds were weak, and the mixed layer depth was shallow (<40 m). Phytoplankton growth conditions were favourable during this time. Phytoplankton biomass roughly doubled within the euphotic zone over the course of about 7 days during mid-April, and rapidly increased towards the end of the study until silicate was depleted. However, the stratification of the water column was transient, and the spring bloom development was repeatedly interrupted by gales. During two storms, in late March and late April, the mixed-layer depth increased to 250 and 175 m, respectively. After the storm events significant amounts of chlorophyll-a, particulate organic carbon and biogenic silica were found well below the euphotic zone. It is estimated that between 56% and 65% of the seasonal new production between winter and early May was exported from the euphotic zone by convective mixing, in particular, during the two storm events. Data from the NABE 47°N study during spring 1989 are re-evaluated. It is found that convective particle export was of importance during the early part of that bloom too, but negligible during the height of the bloom in May 1989. The overall impact of convective particle export during spring 1989 was equivalent to about 36% of new production. In view of these and previously published findings it is concluded that convective transport during spring is a significant process for the export of particulate matter from the euphotic zone in the temperate North Atlantic.
Carbon, Suspended particulate matter, Atmospheric forcing, Oceanic boundary layer, Algal blooms, Particulate flux, AN North Atlantic
0967-0637
1431-1444
Koeve, W.
1c12b0cb-7b13-4060-8c58-d1c81cc7fe78
Pollehne, F.
880e5a1e-7ceb-4af5-b0dd-abcbc7b46cb9
Oschlies, A.
1e17ff79-6084-4a56-b130-7d39dcd7568f
Zeitzschel, B.
d7fa93d3-40d8-41c7-a15c-fc67eff0e9a1
Koeve, W.
1c12b0cb-7b13-4060-8c58-d1c81cc7fe78
Pollehne, F.
880e5a1e-7ceb-4af5-b0dd-abcbc7b46cb9
Oschlies, A.
1e17ff79-6084-4a56-b130-7d39dcd7568f
Zeitzschel, B.
d7fa93d3-40d8-41c7-a15c-fc67eff0e9a1

Koeve, W., Pollehne, F., Oschlies, A. and Zeitzschel, B. (2002) Storm induced convective transport of suspended matter during a spring bloom in the northeast Atlantic Ocean. Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers, 49 (8), 1431-1444. (doi:10.1016/S0967-0637(02)00022-5).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Observations during a spring phytoplankton bloom in the northeast Atlantic between March and May 1992 in the Biotrans region at 47°N, 20°W, are presented. During most of the observation period there was a positive heat flux into the ocean, winds were weak, and the mixed layer depth was shallow (<40 m). Phytoplankton growth conditions were favourable during this time. Phytoplankton biomass roughly doubled within the euphotic zone over the course of about 7 days during mid-April, and rapidly increased towards the end of the study until silicate was depleted. However, the stratification of the water column was transient, and the spring bloom development was repeatedly interrupted by gales. During two storms, in late March and late April, the mixed-layer depth increased to 250 and 175 m, respectively. After the storm events significant amounts of chlorophyll-a, particulate organic carbon and biogenic silica were found well below the euphotic zone. It is estimated that between 56% and 65% of the seasonal new production between winter and early May was exported from the euphotic zone by convective mixing, in particular, during the two storm events. Data from the NABE 47°N study during spring 1989 are re-evaluated. It is found that convective particle export was of importance during the early part of that bloom too, but negligible during the height of the bloom in May 1989. The overall impact of convective particle export during spring 1989 was equivalent to about 36% of new production. In view of these and previously published findings it is concluded that convective transport during spring is a significant process for the export of particulate matter from the euphotic zone in the temperate North Atlantic.

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More information

Published date: 2002
Keywords: Carbon, Suspended particulate matter, Atmospheric forcing, Oceanic boundary layer, Algal blooms, Particulate flux, AN North Atlantic

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 12725
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/12725
ISSN: 0967-0637
PURE UUID: 52f216a2-8b11-4340-bb2b-4d53bab306ae

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Date deposited: 02 Dec 2004
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 06:23

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Contributors

Author: W. Koeve
Author: F. Pollehne
Author: A. Oschlies
Author: B. Zeitzschel

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