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An original way to investigate the siliconizing of carbon materials

An original way to investigate the siliconizing of carbon materials
An original way to investigate the siliconizing of carbon materials
The reaction of liquid silicon with glassy carbon and polycrystalline graphite was investigated according to two siliconizing processes. In the first process, the reactants are progressively heated from room temperature up to 1600 °C. In the second one, the liquid silicon is poured onto the carbon sample once the reactants have reached the required temperature, in order to consider short reaction times. Thus, an original equipment consisting of a graphite reactor, has been specially designed for this purpose. The nature and the growth rate of the resulting silicon carbide has been studied using scanning electron microscopy. The results showed the formation of a thin continuous layer of SiC crystallites at the liquid silicon/carbon interface. The thickness of the layer shortly becomes independent of reaction time (about 10 µm on glassy carbon and 15 µm on polycrystalline graphite after 30 min reaction time) while some isolated SiC particles appear in the solidified silicon phase, as well as a regular and unusual time dependent SiC layer at the silicon melt/atmosphere interface.
D. Carbon, D. SiC, Graphite, Infiltration, Liquid silicon
235-243
Favre, A.
89a990d7-7442-48f4-81ce-983c98328ef3
Fuzellier, H.
7aa6f770-2bd6-4d58-8acd-54b4c063ba33
Suptil, J.
07fbffea-ff5a-4f24-80fe-9df73e2f505a
Favre, A.
89a990d7-7442-48f4-81ce-983c98328ef3
Fuzellier, H.
7aa6f770-2bd6-4d58-8acd-54b4c063ba33
Suptil, J.
07fbffea-ff5a-4f24-80fe-9df73e2f505a

Favre, A., Fuzellier, H. and Suptil, J. (2003) An original way to investigate the siliconizing of carbon materials. Ceramics International, 29 (3), 235-243. (doi:10.1016/S0272-8842(02)00110-4).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The reaction of liquid silicon with glassy carbon and polycrystalline graphite was investigated according to two siliconizing processes. In the first process, the reactants are progressively heated from room temperature up to 1600 °C. In the second one, the liquid silicon is poured onto the carbon sample once the reactants have reached the required temperature, in order to consider short reaction times. Thus, an original equipment consisting of a graphite reactor, has been specially designed for this purpose. The nature and the growth rate of the resulting silicon carbide has been studied using scanning electron microscopy. The results showed the formation of a thin continuous layer of SiC crystallites at the liquid silicon/carbon interface. The thickness of the layer shortly becomes independent of reaction time (about 10 µm on glassy carbon and 15 µm on polycrystalline graphite after 30 min reaction time) while some isolated SiC particles appear in the solidified silicon phase, as well as a regular and unusual time dependent SiC layer at the silicon melt/atmosphere interface.

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More information

Published date: 2003
Keywords: D. Carbon, D. SiC, Graphite, Infiltration, Liquid silicon

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 13817
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/13817
PURE UUID: 06075d0a-74d6-49d4-982d-ec7f942a3f54

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Jan 2005
Last modified: 08 Jan 2022 12:48

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Contributors

Author: A. Favre
Author: H. Fuzellier
Author: J. Suptil

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