The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

How temporal distance from past selves influences self-perception

How temporal distance from past selves influences self-perception
How temporal distance from past selves influences self-perception
The present studies examine how perceived temporal distance from past selves influences perceptions of the current self.
Participants recalled their past self either at age 9 or 15. These two past selves differ in levels of dentification with gender and thus denote different standards of comparison. Three hypotheses were tested. Temporal distance should determine whether recalled past selves produce assimilation or contrast effects on the current self. Second, temporal comparison effects should be weaker when people recall their past in terms of stable, relatively enduring characteristics (e.g. traits). Third, past selves should to a greater extent be biased by stereotypical knowledge about former lifetime periods the farther
away individuals feel from past selves. Past selves coloured by stereotypical knowledge are more extreme and should thus produce stronger judgemental effects on the current self. The results supported the hypotheses. Implications for autobiographical remembering are discussed.
0046-2772
697-714
Broemer, Philip
77c0e4e2-ba4d-4828-a849-bb8871d9d3d9
Grabowski, Adam
52839aa6-3f31-4436-8af5-dfd829c58e41
Gebauer, Jochen E.
640d0e31-73ed-42c9-bc70-a1784ee816f9
Germel, Olga
f017f3ae-893f-4db1-b49a-8b894589dcdd
Diehl, Michael
77f988ab-494b-474b-9603-70243bd144b2
Broemer, Philip
77c0e4e2-ba4d-4828-a849-bb8871d9d3d9
Grabowski, Adam
52839aa6-3f31-4436-8af5-dfd829c58e41
Gebauer, Jochen E.
640d0e31-73ed-42c9-bc70-a1784ee816f9
Germel, Olga
f017f3ae-893f-4db1-b49a-8b894589dcdd
Diehl, Michael
77f988ab-494b-474b-9603-70243bd144b2

Broemer, Philip, Grabowski, Adam, Gebauer, Jochen E., Germel, Olga and Diehl, Michael (2008) How temporal distance from past selves influences self-perception. European Journal of Social Psychology, 38 (4), 697-714. (doi:10.1002/ejsp.469).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The present studies examine how perceived temporal distance from past selves influences perceptions of the current self.
Participants recalled their past self either at age 9 or 15. These two past selves differ in levels of dentification with gender and thus denote different standards of comparison. Three hypotheses were tested. Temporal distance should determine whether recalled past selves produce assimilation or contrast effects on the current self. Second, temporal comparison effects should be weaker when people recall their past in terms of stable, relatively enduring characteristics (e.g. traits). Third, past selves should to a greater extent be biased by stereotypical knowledge about former lifetime periods the farther
away individuals feel from past selves. Past selves coloured by stereotypical knowledge are more extreme and should thus produce stronger judgemental effects on the current self. The results supported the hypotheses. Implications for autobiographical remembering are discussed.

PDF
Broemer et al, EJSP, 2008.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only

More information

Published date: June 2008

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 142807
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/142807
ISSN: 0046-2772
PURE UUID: c35641f2-8ee1-405d-b180-1935df9c6c5c

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Apr 2010 10:36
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 23:11

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×