The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The assembly of micron sized glass spheres on structured surfaces by dewetting

The assembly of micron sized glass spheres on structured surfaces by dewetting
The assembly of micron sized glass spheres on structured surfaces by dewetting
Previous work [E.J. Tull, P.N. Bartlett, K.R. Ryan, Controlled assembly of micrometer-sized spheres: theory and application, Langmuir 23 (14) (2007) 7859–7873] has shown that many conventional assembly techniques are ineffective for the organisation of glassy spheres ?5 ?m in diameter, into sparse patterns of interest for optoelectronic device applications. In the present work the assembly of 10 ?m glass spheres on gold coated surfaces containing a distribution of pits was investigated in order to determine the conditions required to assemble glass spheres into the pits but leave the top surface free of adhering spheres when the surface dewets. The gold surfaces were patterned with self-assembled monolayers of thiols in order to control the wetting of the surface. When the surface is uniformly hydrophilic spheres are found to adhere everywhere. When the surface is uniformly hydrophobic no spheres remain or the surface or in the pits. Only when the pits were hydrophilic and the top surface hydrophobic was found possible to assemble spheres selectively into the pits.

spheres, self-assembly, structured substrates, wetting, capillary, PDMS, chemical patterning, particles
0927-7757
71-78
Tull, Elizabeth J.
a5bc1534-4c85-400b-826d-2d9012442faa
Bartlett, Phillip N.
d99446db-a59d-4f89-96eb-f64b5d8bb075
Tull, Elizabeth J.
a5bc1534-4c85-400b-826d-2d9012442faa
Bartlett, Phillip N.
d99446db-a59d-4f89-96eb-f64b5d8bb075

Tull, Elizabeth J. and Bartlett, Phillip N. (2008) The assembly of micron sized glass spheres on structured surfaces by dewetting. Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 327 (1-3), 71-78. (doi:10.1016/j.colsurfa.2008.06.020).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Previous work [E.J. Tull, P.N. Bartlett, K.R. Ryan, Controlled assembly of micrometer-sized spheres: theory and application, Langmuir 23 (14) (2007) 7859–7873] has shown that many conventional assembly techniques are ineffective for the organisation of glassy spheres ?5 ?m in diameter, into sparse patterns of interest for optoelectronic device applications. In the present work the assembly of 10 ?m glass spheres on gold coated surfaces containing a distribution of pits was investigated in order to determine the conditions required to assemble glass spheres into the pits but leave the top surface free of adhering spheres when the surface dewets. The gold surfaces were patterned with self-assembled monolayers of thiols in order to control the wetting of the surface. When the surface is uniformly hydrophilic spheres are found to adhere everywhere. When the surface is uniformly hydrophobic no spheres remain or the surface or in the pits. Only when the pits were hydrophilic and the top surface hydrophobic was found possible to assemble spheres selectively into the pits.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 15 September 2008
Keywords: spheres, self-assembly, structured substrates, wetting, capillary, PDMS, chemical patterning, particles

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 145039
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/145039
ISSN: 0927-7757
PURE UUID: 0d310daa-527e-4522-b334-ef9d4cf8be2d
ORCID for Phillip N. Bartlett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7300-6900

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Apr 2010 15:00
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 02:04

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×