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Language ability in children with permanent hearing impairment: the influence of early management and family participation

Language ability in children with permanent hearing impairment: the influence of early management and family participation
Language ability in children with permanent hearing impairment: the influence of early management and family participation
OBJECTIVE. The goal was to examine the relationships between management after confirmation, family participation, and speech and language outcomes in the same group of children with permanent childhood hearing impairment.METHODS. Speech, oral language, and nonverbal abilities, expressed as z scores and adjusted in a regression model, and Family Participation Rating Scale scores were assessed at a mean age of 7.9 years for 120 children with bilateral permanent childhood hearing impairment from a 1992–1997 United Kingdom birth cohort. Ages at institution of management and hearing aid fitting were obtained retrospectively from case notes.RESULTS. Compared with children managed later (>9 months), those managed early (≤9 months) had higher adjusted mean z scores for both receptive and expressive language, relative to nonverbal ability, but not for speech. Compared with children aided later, a smaller group of more-impaired children aided early did not have significantly higher scores for these outcomes. Family Participation Rating Scale scores showed significant positive correlations with language and speech intelligibility scores only for those with confirmation after 9 months and were highest for those with late confirmed, severe/profound, permanent childhood hearing impairment.CONCLUSIONS. Early management of permanent childhood hearing impairment results in improved language. Family participation is also an important factor in cases that are confirmed late, especially for children with severe or profound permanent childhood hearing impairment.
0031-4005
e694-e701
Watkin, Peter
e66d98d0-4de7-4a33-bf02-a959b03ff947
McCann, Donna C.
48792fe1-241f-491b-a5a5-61c8c02c314d
Law, Catherine
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Mullee, Mark A.
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Petrou, Stavros
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Stevenson, Jim E.
0c85d29b-d294-43cb-ab8d-75e4737478e1
Worsfold, Sarah
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Yuen, Ho Ming
b1df4c57-0c2a-44ac-ab40-22b88e8effe8
Kennedy, Colin R.
7c3aff62-0a86-4b44-b7d7-4bc01f23ec93
Watkin, Peter
e66d98d0-4de7-4a33-bf02-a959b03ff947
McCann, Donna C.
48792fe1-241f-491b-a5a5-61c8c02c314d
Law, Catherine
b90db04a-7a74-4211-8409-5aad234bca91
Mullee, Mark A.
fd3f91c3-5e95-4f56-8d73-260824eeb362
Petrou, Stavros
5ee930f5-99db-4fb8-b401-95584cff0e20
Stevenson, Jim E.
0c85d29b-d294-43cb-ab8d-75e4737478e1
Worsfold, Sarah
9e3f6aa2-8c17-4965-adf4-b3bc1d04ab54
Yuen, Ho Ming
b1df4c57-0c2a-44ac-ab40-22b88e8effe8
Kennedy, Colin R.
7c3aff62-0a86-4b44-b7d7-4bc01f23ec93

Watkin, Peter, McCann, Donna C., Law, Catherine, Mullee, Mark A., Petrou, Stavros, Stevenson, Jim E., Worsfold, Sarah, Yuen, Ho Ming and Kennedy, Colin R. (2007) Language ability in children with permanent hearing impairment: the influence of early management and family participation. Pediatrics, 120 (3), e694-e701. (doi:10.1542/peds.2006-2116).

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The goal was to examine the relationships between management after confirmation, family participation, and speech and language outcomes in the same group of children with permanent childhood hearing impairment.METHODS. Speech, oral language, and nonverbal abilities, expressed as z scores and adjusted in a regression model, and Family Participation Rating Scale scores were assessed at a mean age of 7.9 years for 120 children with bilateral permanent childhood hearing impairment from a 1992–1997 United Kingdom birth cohort. Ages at institution of management and hearing aid fitting were obtained retrospectively from case notes.RESULTS. Compared with children managed later (>9 months), those managed early (≤9 months) had higher adjusted mean z scores for both receptive and expressive language, relative to nonverbal ability, but not for speech. Compared with children aided later, a smaller group of more-impaired children aided early did not have significantly higher scores for these outcomes. Family Participation Rating Scale scores showed significant positive correlations with language and speech intelligibility scores only for those with confirmation after 9 months and were highest for those with late confirmed, severe/profound, permanent childhood hearing impairment.CONCLUSIONS. Early management of permanent childhood hearing impairment results in improved language. Family participation is also an important factor in cases that are confirmed late, especially for children with severe or profound permanent childhood hearing impairment.

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Published date: September 2007
Organisations: Primary Care & Population Sciences

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Local EPrints ID: 146007
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/146007
ISSN: 0031-4005
PURE UUID: 2a56be9a-e0d8-4f90-b1b1-1b4885cbfed1

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Date deposited: 10 Jun 2010 10:55
Last modified: 31 Jan 2018 17:32

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