The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Interaction of small gas phase molecules with alumina supported rhodium nanoparticles: an in situ spectroscopic study

Interaction of small gas phase molecules with alumina supported rhodium nanoparticles: an in situ spectroscopic study
Interaction of small gas phase molecules with alumina supported rhodium nanoparticles: an in situ spectroscopic study
Supported nanoparticulate Rh systems are studied as a model system for the important three way catalysts as used in the combustion engines of cars. Small Rh nanoparticles with a small particle size distribution can be easily synthesized and their morphology is studied using x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy.

The interaction of the supported rhodium nanoparticles on ? -Al2O3 with small gas phase molecules like H2, O2, CO, NO, H2S and SO2 is investigated, in situ and time resolved, using a combination of techniques, i.e. XAFS, diffuse
reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and mass spectrometry.

The surface species formed upon exposure of the metal particles to the adsorbing molecules, and their sometimes disruptive interaction with the metal particles, are identified as a function of temperature and time. Dynamic equilibria are observed which change the oxidation state and
the nuclearity of the supported rhodium particles under operational conditions.

Rather than merely adsorb on a catalyst particle, these gases have a substantial role in defining the nature of
the particle.
0953-8984
184020-[10pp]
Evans, J.
05890433-0155-49fe-a65d-38c90ea25c69
Tromp, M.
48c1ebbb-579c-42b6-83bb-7188c668b322
Evans, J.
05890433-0155-49fe-a65d-38c90ea25c69
Tromp, M.
48c1ebbb-579c-42b6-83bb-7188c668b322

Evans, J. and Tromp, M. (2008) Interaction of small gas phase molecules with alumina supported rhodium nanoparticles: an in situ spectroscopic study. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, 20 (18), 184020-[10pp]. (doi:10.1088/0953-8984/20/18/184020).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Supported nanoparticulate Rh systems are studied as a model system for the important three way catalysts as used in the combustion engines of cars. Small Rh nanoparticles with a small particle size distribution can be easily synthesized and their morphology is studied using x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy.

The interaction of the supported rhodium nanoparticles on ? -Al2O3 with small gas phase molecules like H2, O2, CO, NO, H2S and SO2 is investigated, in situ and time resolved, using a combination of techniques, i.e. XAFS, diffuse
reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and mass spectrometry.

The surface species formed upon exposure of the metal particles to the adsorbing molecules, and their sometimes disruptive interaction with the metal particles, are identified as a function of temperature and time. Dynamic equilibria are observed which change the oxidation state and
the nuclearity of the supported rhodium particles under operational conditions.

Rather than merely adsorb on a catalyst particle, these gases have a substantial role in defining the nature of
the particle.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 17 April 2008

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 146133
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/146133
ISSN: 0953-8984
PURE UUID: fa0448f2-24b5-4684-881d-b46cc9973e50

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Apr 2010 15:28
Last modified: 17 Jul 2019 00:05

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: J. Evans
Author: M. Tromp

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×