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Study on the pyrolytic behaviour of xylan-based hemicellulose using TG–FTIR and Py–GC–FTIR

Study on the pyrolytic behaviour of xylan-based hemicellulose using TG–FTIR and Py–GC–FTIR
Study on the pyrolytic behaviour of xylan-based hemicellulose using TG–FTIR and Py–GC–FTIR
Two sets of experiments, categorized as TG–FTIR and Py–GC–FTIR, are employed to investigate the mechanism of the hemicellulose pyrolysis and the formation of main gaseous and bio-oil products. The “sharp mass loss stage” and the corresponding evolution of the volatile products are examined by the TG–FTIR graphs at the heating rate of 3–80 K/min. A pyrolysis unit, composed of fluidized bed reactor, carbon filter, vapour condensing system and gas storage, is employed to investigate the products of the hemicellulose pyrolysis under different temperatures (400–690 °C) at the feeding flow rate of 600 l/h. The effects of temperature on the condensable products are examined thoroughly. The possible routes for the formation of the products are systematically proposed from the primary decomposition of the three types of unit (xylan, O-acetylxylan and 4-O-methylglucuronic acid) and the secondary reactions of the fragments. It is found that the formation of CO is enhanced with elevated temperature, while slight change is observed for the yield of CO2 which is the predominant products in the gaseous mixture.

hemicellulose, pyrolysis, TG–FTIR, GC–FTIR, bio-oil, char
0165-2370
199-206
Gu, Sai
a6f7af91-4731-46fe-ac4d-3081890ab704
Gu, Sai
a6f7af91-4731-46fe-ac4d-3081890ab704

Gu, Sai (2010) Study on the pyrolytic behaviour of xylan-based hemicellulose using TG–FTIR and Py–GC–FTIR. Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, 87 (2), 199-206. (doi:10.1016/j.jaap.2009.12.001).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Two sets of experiments, categorized as TG–FTIR and Py–GC–FTIR, are employed to investigate the mechanism of the hemicellulose pyrolysis and the formation of main gaseous and bio-oil products. The “sharp mass loss stage” and the corresponding evolution of the volatile products are examined by the TG–FTIR graphs at the heating rate of 3–80 K/min. A pyrolysis unit, composed of fluidized bed reactor, carbon filter, vapour condensing system and gas storage, is employed to investigate the products of the hemicellulose pyrolysis under different temperatures (400–690 °C) at the feeding flow rate of 600 l/h. The effects of temperature on the condensable products are examined thoroughly. The possible routes for the formation of the products are systematically proposed from the primary decomposition of the three types of unit (xylan, O-acetylxylan and 4-O-methylglucuronic acid) and the secondary reactions of the fragments. It is found that the formation of CO is enhanced with elevated temperature, while slight change is observed for the yield of CO2 which is the predominant products in the gaseous mixture.

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Published date: March 2010
Keywords: hemicellulose, pyrolysis, TG–FTIR, GC–FTIR, bio-oil, char

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 147409
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/147409
ISSN: 0165-2370
PURE UUID: 162ab72b-b642-4f4c-bb84-0903b82c4b83

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Date deposited: 26 Apr 2010 08:44
Last modified: 09 Dec 2019 20:27

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Author: Sai Gu

University divisions

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