The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The use of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as therapeutic agents for inflammatory diseases

The use of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as therapeutic agents for inflammatory diseases
The use of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as therapeutic agents for inflammatory diseases
With regard to inflammatory processes, the main fatty acids of interest are the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) arachidonic acid, which is the precursor of inflammatory eicosanoids like prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4, and the n-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). EPA and DHA are found in oily fish and fish oils. EPA and DHA inhibit arachidonic acid metabolism to inflammatory eicosanoids. They also give rise to mediators that are less inflammatory than those produced from arachidonic acid or that are anti-inflammatory. In addition to modifying the lipid mediator profile, n-3 PUFAs exert effects on other aspects of inflammation like leukocyte chemotaxis, expression of adhesion molecules and production of inflammatory cytokines. Because of their potential as anti-inflammatory agents they may be of therapeutic use in a variety of acute and chronic inflammatory settings. Evidence of their clinical efficacy is reasonably strong in some settings (e.g. in rheumatoid arthritis) but is weak in others (e.g. in inflammatory bowel diseases and asthma). More, better designed and larger trials are required in inflammatory diseases to assess the therapeutic potential of long chain n-3 PUFAs in these conditions
fatty acid, inflammation, cytokine, eicosanoid, fish oil
45-54
Calder, P.C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Calder, P.C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6

Calder, P.C. (2009) The use of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as therapeutic agents for inflammatory diseases. Immunology, Endocrine & Metabolic Agents in Medicinal Chemistry, 9 (1), 45-54. (doi:10.2174/187152209788009788).

Record type: Article

Abstract

With regard to inflammatory processes, the main fatty acids of interest are the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) arachidonic acid, which is the precursor of inflammatory eicosanoids like prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4, and the n-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). EPA and DHA are found in oily fish and fish oils. EPA and DHA inhibit arachidonic acid metabolism to inflammatory eicosanoids. They also give rise to mediators that are less inflammatory than those produced from arachidonic acid or that are anti-inflammatory. In addition to modifying the lipid mediator profile, n-3 PUFAs exert effects on other aspects of inflammation like leukocyte chemotaxis, expression of adhesion molecules and production of inflammatory cytokines. Because of their potential as anti-inflammatory agents they may be of therapeutic use in a variety of acute and chronic inflammatory settings. Evidence of their clinical efficacy is reasonably strong in some settings (e.g. in rheumatoid arthritis) but is weak in others (e.g. in inflammatory bowel diseases and asthma). More, better designed and larger trials are required in inflammatory diseases to assess the therapeutic potential of long chain n-3 PUFAs in these conditions

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 1 March 2009
Keywords: fatty acid, inflammation, cytokine, eicosanoid, fish oil

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 147687
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/147687
PURE UUID: 7770b652-7f14-40fc-94c7-ca3ff5ae53ea

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Apr 2010 11:53
Last modified: 17 Jul 2019 00:04

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×