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Evolution of buoyant bubbles in M87

Evolution of buoyant bubbles in M87
Evolution of buoyant bubbles in M87
The morphology of the X-ray and radio-emitting features in the central ~50 kpc region around the galaxy M87 strongly suggests that buoyant bubbles of cosmic rays (inflated by an earlier nuclear active phase of the galaxy) rise through the cooling gas at roughly half the sound speed. In the absence of strong surface tension, initially spherical bubbles will transform into tori as they rise through an external medium. Such structures can be identified in the radio images of the halo of M87. During their rise, bubbles will uplift relatively cool X-ray-emitting gas from the central regions of the cooling flow to larger distances. This gas is colder than the ambient gas and has a higher volume emissivity. As a result, rising "radio" bubbles may be trailed by elongated X-ray features, as indeed is observed in M87. We performed simple hydrodynamic simulations to illustrate qualitatively the evolution of buoyant bubbles in the M87 environment.
cooling flows-galaxies, active-galaxies, clusters, individual (virgo)-galaxies, individual (M87)-x-rays, galaxies
0004-637X
261-273
Churazov, E.
a56d266c-65ec-4dcf-9355-4d481026ab4f
Brüggen, M.
22978d12-1091-42aa-a172-6cda407ba55b
Kaiser, C.R.
a486973d-799c-401e-aa99-47dddd3972f7
Böhringer, H.
c2254e9f-6d54-4f36-a7ae-06a93417e184
Forman, W.
4450274a-15ab-4986-91f0-ecbee3963dec
Churazov, E.
a56d266c-65ec-4dcf-9355-4d481026ab4f
Brüggen, M.
22978d12-1091-42aa-a172-6cda407ba55b
Kaiser, C.R.
a486973d-799c-401e-aa99-47dddd3972f7
Böhringer, H.
c2254e9f-6d54-4f36-a7ae-06a93417e184
Forman, W.
4450274a-15ab-4986-91f0-ecbee3963dec

Churazov, E., Brüggen, M., Kaiser, C.R., Böhringer, H. and Forman, W. (2001) Evolution of buoyant bubbles in M87. Astrophysical Journal, 554 (1), 261-273. (doi:10.1086/321357).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The morphology of the X-ray and radio-emitting features in the central ~50 kpc region around the galaxy M87 strongly suggests that buoyant bubbles of cosmic rays (inflated by an earlier nuclear active phase of the galaxy) rise through the cooling gas at roughly half the sound speed. In the absence of strong surface tension, initially spherical bubbles will transform into tori as they rise through an external medium. Such structures can be identified in the radio images of the halo of M87. During their rise, bubbles will uplift relatively cool X-ray-emitting gas from the central regions of the cooling flow to larger distances. This gas is colder than the ambient gas and has a higher volume emissivity. As a result, rising "radio" bubbles may be trailed by elongated X-ray features, as indeed is observed in M87. We performed simple hydrodynamic simulations to illustrate qualitatively the evolution of buoyant bubbles in the M87 environment.

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Published date: 10 June 2001
Keywords: cooling flows-galaxies, active-galaxies, clusters, individual (virgo)-galaxies, individual (M87)-x-rays, galaxies

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 14775
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/14775
ISSN: 0004-637X
PURE UUID: 98e05d45-c04c-43ab-8166-eeaa00178271

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Date deposited: 01 Mar 2005
Last modified: 27 Apr 2022 06:23

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Contributors

Author: E. Churazov
Author: M. Brüggen
Author: C.R. Kaiser
Author: H. Böhringer
Author: W. Forman

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