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Rationale for using new lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition and a review of the trials performed in adults

Rationale for using new lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition and a review of the trials performed in adults
Rationale for using new lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition and a review of the trials performed in adults
Lipids traditionally used in parenteral nutrition are based on n-6 fatty acid-rich vegetable oils such as soyabean oil. This practice may not be optimal because it may present an excessive supply of linoleic acid. Alternatives to the use of soyabean oil include its partial replacement by so-called medium-chain TAG (MCT), olive oil or fish oil, either alone or in combination. Lipid emulsions containing MCT are well established, but those containing olive oil and fish oil, although commercially available, are still undergoing trials in different patient groups. Emulsions containing olive oil or fish oil are well tolerated and without adverse effects in a wide range of adult patients. An olive oil–soyabean oil emulsion has been used in quite small studies in critically-ill patients and in patients with trauma or burns with little real evidence of advantage over soyabean oil or MCT–soyabean oil. Fish oil-containing lipid emulsions have been used in adult patients post surgery (mainly gastrointestinal). This approach has been associated with alterations in patterns of inflammatory mediators and in immune function and, in some studies, a reduction in the length of stay in the intensive care unit and in hospital. One study indicates that peri-operative administration of fish oil may be superior to post-operative administration. Fish oil has been used in critically-ill adults. Here, the influence on inflammatory processes, immune function and clinical end points is not clear, since there are too few studies and those that are available report contradictory findings. One important factor is the dose of fish oil required to influence clinical outcomes. Further studies that are properly designed and adequately powered are required in order to strengthen the evidence base relating to the use of lipid emulsions that include olive oil and fish oil in critically-ill patients and in patients post surgery
0029-6651
252-260
Calder, P.C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Calder, P.C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6

Calder, P.C. (2009) Rationale for using new lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition and a review of the trials performed in adults. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 68, 252-260. (doi:10.1017/S0029665109001268).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Lipids traditionally used in parenteral nutrition are based on n-6 fatty acid-rich vegetable oils such as soyabean oil. This practice may not be optimal because it may present an excessive supply of linoleic acid. Alternatives to the use of soyabean oil include its partial replacement by so-called medium-chain TAG (MCT), olive oil or fish oil, either alone or in combination. Lipid emulsions containing MCT are well established, but those containing olive oil and fish oil, although commercially available, are still undergoing trials in different patient groups. Emulsions containing olive oil or fish oil are well tolerated and without adverse effects in a wide range of adult patients. An olive oil–soyabean oil emulsion has been used in quite small studies in critically-ill patients and in patients with trauma or burns with little real evidence of advantage over soyabean oil or MCT–soyabean oil. Fish oil-containing lipid emulsions have been used in adult patients post surgery (mainly gastrointestinal). This approach has been associated with alterations in patterns of inflammatory mediators and in immune function and, in some studies, a reduction in the length of stay in the intensive care unit and in hospital. One study indicates that peri-operative administration of fish oil may be superior to post-operative administration. Fish oil has been used in critically-ill adults. Here, the influence on inflammatory processes, immune function and clinical end points is not clear, since there are too few studies and those that are available report contradictory findings. One important factor is the dose of fish oil required to influence clinical outcomes. Further studies that are properly designed and adequately powered are required in order to strengthen the evidence base relating to the use of lipid emulsions that include olive oil and fish oil in critically-ill patients and in patients post surgery

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Published date: 11 May 2009

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Local EPrints ID: 147785
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/147785
ISSN: 0029-6651
PURE UUID: d387ed09-01e3-46f0-9a89-0ea398b47f6f

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Date deposited: 26 Apr 2010 13:04
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 19:33

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Author: P.C. Calder

University divisions

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