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Climate change and Arctic ecosystems: 1. Vegetation changes north of 55°N between the last glacial maximum, mid-Holocene, and present

Climate change and Arctic ecosystems: 1. Vegetation changes north of 55°N between the last glacial maximum, mid-Holocene, and present
Climate change and Arctic ecosystems: 1. Vegetation changes north of 55°N between the last glacial maximum, mid-Holocene, and present
A unified scheme to assign pollen samples to vegetation types was used to reconstruct vegetation patterns north of 55°N at the last glacial maximum (LGM) and mid-Holocene (6000 years B.P.). The pollen data set assembled for this purpose represents a comprehensive compilation based on the work of many projects and research groups. Five tundra types (cushion forb tundra, graminoid and forb tundra, prostrate dwarf-shrub tundra, erect dwarf-shrub tundra, and low- and high-shrub tundra) were distinguished and mapped on the basis of modern pollen surface samples. The tundra-forest boundary and the distributions of boreal and temperate forest types today were realistically reconstructed. During the mid-Holocene the tundra-forest boundary was north of its present position in some regions, but the pattern of this shift was strongly asymmetrical around the pole, with the largest northward shift in central Siberia (?200 km), little change in Beringia, and a southward shift in Keewatin and Labrador (?200 km). Low- and high-shrub tundra extended farther north than today. At the LGM, forests were absent from high latitudes. Graminoid and forb tundra abutted on temperate steppe in northwestern Eurasia while prostrate dwarf-shrub, erect dwarf-shrub, and graminoid and forb tundra formed a mosaic in Beringia. Graminoid and forb tundra is restricted today and does not form a large continuous biome, but the pollen data show that it was far more extensive at the LGM, while low- and high-shrub tundra were greatly reduced, illustrating the potential for climate change to dramatically alter the relative areas occupied by different vegetation types.
0148-0227
11-[25pp]
Bigelow, N.H.
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Brubaker, Linda B.
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Edwards, M.E.
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Harrison, S.P.
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Prentice, I. Colin
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Anderson, P.M.
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Andreev, A.A.
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Bartlein, Patrick J.
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Christensen, Torben R.
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Cramer, Wolfgang
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Kaplan, Jed O.
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Lozhkin, Anatoly V.
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Matveyeva, Nadja V.
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Murray, David F.
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McGuire, A. David
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Razzhivin, Volodya Y.
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Ritchie, James C.
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Smith, Benjamin
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Walker, Donald A.
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Gajewski, Konrad
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Wolf, Victoria
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Holmqvist, Bjorn H.
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Igarashi, Yaeko
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Kremenetskii, Konstantin
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Paus, Aage
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Pisaric, Michael F. J.
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Volkova, Valentina S.
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Bigelow, N.H.
fa1154ff-e096-4c06-a361-3a08374ed6ba
Brubaker, Linda B.
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Edwards, M.E.
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Harrison, S.P.
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Prentice, I. Colin
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Anderson, P.M.
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Andreev, A.A.
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Bartlein, Patrick J.
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Christensen, Torben R.
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Cramer, Wolfgang
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Kaplan, Jed O.
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Lozhkin, Anatoly V.
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Matveyeva, Nadja V.
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Murray, David F.
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McGuire, A. David
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Razzhivin, Volodya Y.
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Ritchie, James C.
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Smith, Benjamin
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Walker, Donald A.
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Gajewski, Konrad
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Wolf, Victoria
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Holmqvist, Bjorn H.
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Igarashi, Yaeko
289cddcd-d26b-4b17-a69c-53c20a685771
Kremenetskii, Konstantin
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Paus, Aage
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Pisaric, Michael F. J.
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Volkova, Valentina S.
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Bigelow, N.H., Brubaker, Linda B., Edwards, M.E., Harrison, S.P., Prentice, I. Colin, Anderson, P.M., Andreev, A.A., Bartlein, Patrick J., Christensen, Torben R., Cramer, Wolfgang, Kaplan, Jed O., Lozhkin, Anatoly V., Matveyeva, Nadja V., Murray, David F., McGuire, A. David, Razzhivin, Volodya Y., Ritchie, James C., Smith, Benjamin, Walker, Donald A., Gajewski, Konrad, Wolf, Victoria, Holmqvist, Bjorn H., Igarashi, Yaeko, Kremenetskii, Konstantin, Paus, Aage, Pisaric, Michael F. J. and Volkova, Valentina S. (2003) Climate change and Arctic ecosystems: 1. Vegetation changes north of 55°N between the last glacial maximum, mid-Holocene, and present. Journal of Geophysical Research, 108 (D19, 8170), 11-[25pp]. (doi:10.1029/2002JD002558).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A unified scheme to assign pollen samples to vegetation types was used to reconstruct vegetation patterns north of 55°N at the last glacial maximum (LGM) and mid-Holocene (6000 years B.P.). The pollen data set assembled for this purpose represents a comprehensive compilation based on the work of many projects and research groups. Five tundra types (cushion forb tundra, graminoid and forb tundra, prostrate dwarf-shrub tundra, erect dwarf-shrub tundra, and low- and high-shrub tundra) were distinguished and mapped on the basis of modern pollen surface samples. The tundra-forest boundary and the distributions of boreal and temperate forest types today were realistically reconstructed. During the mid-Holocene the tundra-forest boundary was north of its present position in some regions, but the pattern of this shift was strongly asymmetrical around the pole, with the largest northward shift in central Siberia (?200 km), little change in Beringia, and a southward shift in Keewatin and Labrador (?200 km). Low- and high-shrub tundra extended farther north than today. At the LGM, forests were absent from high latitudes. Graminoid and forb tundra abutted on temperate steppe in northwestern Eurasia while prostrate dwarf-shrub, erect dwarf-shrub, and graminoid and forb tundra formed a mosaic in Beringia. Graminoid and forb tundra is restricted today and does not form a large continuous biome, but the pollen data show that it was far more extensive at the LGM, while low- and high-shrub tundra were greatly reduced, illustrating the potential for climate change to dramatically alter the relative areas occupied by different vegetation types.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Submitted date: 26 May 2002
Published date: 10 August 2003
Additional Information: This international collaboration to reconstruct structural-functional details of past arctic vegetation using fossil pollen data developed an objective, algorithm-based method and also improved specifications of tundra in a key vegetation model used in data-model comparisons. I supervised the post-doc doing the work. Authorship reflects post-doc, organizers (alphabetic order), et al.

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 14809
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/14809
ISSN: 0148-0227
PURE UUID: c99f8162-663b-4ba6-98f6-ccacb9304fdc
ORCID for M.E. Edwards: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3490-6682

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 Mar 2005
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:48

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Contributors

Author: N.H. Bigelow
Author: Linda B. Brubaker
Author: M.E. Edwards ORCID iD
Author: S.P. Harrison
Author: I. Colin Prentice
Author: P.M. Anderson
Author: A.A. Andreev
Author: Patrick J. Bartlein
Author: Torben R. Christensen
Author: Wolfgang Cramer
Author: Jed O. Kaplan
Author: Anatoly V. Lozhkin
Author: Nadja V. Matveyeva
Author: David F. Murray
Author: A. David McGuire
Author: Volodya Y. Razzhivin
Author: James C. Ritchie
Author: Benjamin Smith
Author: Donald A. Walker
Author: Konrad Gajewski
Author: Victoria Wolf
Author: Bjorn H. Holmqvist
Author: Yaeko Igarashi
Author: Konstantin Kremenetskii
Author: Aage Paus
Author: Michael F. J. Pisaric
Author: Valentina S. Volkova

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