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Anti-inflammatory actions of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids

Anti-inflammatory actions of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids
Anti-inflammatory actions of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids
Inflammation is a normal defense mechanism that protects the host from infection and other insults; it initiates pathogen killing as well as tissue repair processes and helps to restore homeostasis at infected or damaged sites 1. It is typified by redness, swelling, heat, pain and loss of function, and involves interactions amongst many cell types and the production of, and responses to, a number of chemical mediators. Where an inflammatory response does occur, it is normally well regulated in order that it does not cause excessive damage to the host, is self-limiting and resolves rapidly. This self-regulation involves the activation of negative feedback mechanisms such as the secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines, inhibition of pro-inflammatory signaling cascades, shedding of receptors for inflammatory mediators, and activation of regulatory cells. As such, when controlled properly, regulated inflammatory responses are essential to remain healthy and maintain homeostasis. Pathological inflammation involves a loss of tolerance and/or of regulatory processes. Where this becomes excessive, irreparable damage to host tissues and disease can occur. A number of diseases and conditions are now recognized to involve inflammation or to have an inflammatory component. These include the "classic" inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's Disease, and asthma. However, other common lifestyle-related diseases such as atherosclerosis and obesity are now known to have an important inflammatory component, as do degenerative diseases of aging like Alzheimer's Disease.

Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6

Calder, Philip C. (2009) Anti-inflammatory actions of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 Learning for Health & Medicine, (3).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Inflammation is a normal defense mechanism that protects the host from infection and other insults; it initiates pathogen killing as well as tissue repair processes and helps to restore homeostasis at infected or damaged sites 1. It is typified by redness, swelling, heat, pain and loss of function, and involves interactions amongst many cell types and the production of, and responses to, a number of chemical mediators. Where an inflammatory response does occur, it is normally well regulated in order that it does not cause excessive damage to the host, is self-limiting and resolves rapidly. This self-regulation involves the activation of negative feedback mechanisms such as the secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines, inhibition of pro-inflammatory signaling cascades, shedding of receptors for inflammatory mediators, and activation of regulatory cells. As such, when controlled properly, regulated inflammatory responses are essential to remain healthy and maintain homeostasis. Pathological inflammation involves a loss of tolerance and/or of regulatory processes. Where this becomes excessive, irreparable damage to host tissues and disease can occur. A number of diseases and conditions are now recognized to involve inflammation or to have an inflammatory component. These include the "classic" inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's Disease, and asthma. However, other common lifestyle-related diseases such as atherosclerosis and obesity are now known to have an important inflammatory component, as do degenerative diseases of aging like Alzheimer's Disease.

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Published date: December 2009

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 148171
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/148171
PURE UUID: e0c30acf-e54e-4077-a4c6-c412bbc4bff6

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Date deposited: 27 Apr 2010 12:13
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 19:32

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