The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Predispositions to approach and avoid are contextually sensitive and goal dependent

Predispositions to approach and avoid are contextually sensitive and goal dependent
Predispositions to approach and avoid are contextually sensitive and goal dependent
The authors show that predispositions to approach and avoid do not consist simply of specific motor patterns but are more abstract functions that produce a desired environmental effect. It has been claimed that evaluating a visual stimulus as positive or negative evokes a specific motor response, extending the arm to negative stimuli, and contracting to positive stimuli. The authors showed that a large congruency effect (participants were faster to approach pleasant and avoid unpleasant stimuli, than to approach unpleasant and avoid pleasant stimuli) could be produced on a novel touchscreen paradigm (Experiment 1), and that the congruency effect could be reversed by spatial (Experiment 2) and nonspatial (Experiment 3) response effects. Thus, involuntary approach and avoid response activations are not fixed, but sensitive to context, and are specifically based on the desired goal.
1528-3542
174-183
Bamford, Susan
9b57bccd-485f-4d05-aa46-62687293e97a
Ward, Robert
611e73dc-b9ed-4920-a3aa-68dbf032fd9a
Bamford, Susan
9b57bccd-485f-4d05-aa46-62687293e97a
Ward, Robert
611e73dc-b9ed-4920-a3aa-68dbf032fd9a

Bamford, Susan and Ward, Robert (2008) Predispositions to approach and avoid are contextually sensitive and goal dependent. Emotion, 8 (2), 174-183. (doi:10.1037/1528-3542.8.2.174).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The authors show that predispositions to approach and avoid do not consist simply of specific motor patterns but are more abstract functions that produce a desired environmental effect. It has been claimed that evaluating a visual stimulus as positive or negative evokes a specific motor response, extending the arm to negative stimuli, and contracting to positive stimuli. The authors showed that a large congruency effect (participants were faster to approach pleasant and avoid unpleasant stimuli, than to approach unpleasant and avoid pleasant stimuli) could be produced on a novel touchscreen paradigm (Experiment 1), and that the congruency effect could be reversed by spatial (Experiment 2) and nonspatial (Experiment 3) response effects. Thus, involuntary approach and avoid response activations are not fixed, but sensitive to context, and are specifically based on the desired goal.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: April 2008

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 148395
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/148395
ISSN: 1528-3542
PURE UUID: 8d470a0d-6ee0-405d-a774-1081320977d9

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Apr 2010 08:29
Last modified: 17 Jul 2019 00:03

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×