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Trace-strength and source-monitoring accounts of accuracy and metacognitive resolution in the misinformation paradigm

Trace-strength and source-monitoring accounts of accuracy and metacognitive resolution in the misinformation paradigm
Trace-strength and source-monitoring accounts of accuracy and metacognitive resolution in the misinformation paradigm
Two experiments are reported that investigate the impact of misinformation on memory accuracy and metacognitive resolution. In Experiment 1, participants viewed a series of photographs depicting a crime scene, were exposed to misinformation that contradicted details in the slides, and later took a recognition memory test. For each answer, participants were required to indicate whether they were willing to testify (report) their answer to the Court and to rate confidence. Misinformation impaired memory accuracy but it had no effect on resolution, regardless of whether resolution was indexed with confidence-rating measures (gamma correlation and mean confidence) or a report-option measure (type-2 discrimination: d’). In Experiment 2, a similar accuracy-confidence dissociation was found, and the misinformation effect occurred mostly with fine-grained responses, suggesting that responding was based on recollected details. We argue that the results support source-monitoring accounts of accuracy and resolution rather than accounts based on trace strength.
0888-4080
324-335
Higham, P. A.
4093b28f-7d58-4d18-89d4-021792e418e7
Luna, K.
d90e7b9d-da52-49ef-b73d-33ddcc83746b
Bloomfield, J.
8b344435-7fb9-485c-9103-f0eb50e316de
Higham, P. A.
4093b28f-7d58-4d18-89d4-021792e418e7
Luna, K.
d90e7b9d-da52-49ef-b73d-33ddcc83746b
Bloomfield, J.
8b344435-7fb9-485c-9103-f0eb50e316de

Higham, P. A., Luna, K. and Bloomfield, J. (2011) Trace-strength and source-monitoring accounts of accuracy and metacognitive resolution in the misinformation paradigm. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 25, 324-335. (doi:10.1002/acp.1694).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Two experiments are reported that investigate the impact of misinformation on memory accuracy and metacognitive resolution. In Experiment 1, participants viewed a series of photographs depicting a crime scene, were exposed to misinformation that contradicted details in the slides, and later took a recognition memory test. For each answer, participants were required to indicate whether they were willing to testify (report) their answer to the Court and to rate confidence. Misinformation impaired memory accuracy but it had no effect on resolution, regardless of whether resolution was indexed with confidence-rating measures (gamma correlation and mean confidence) or a report-option measure (type-2 discrimination: d’). In Experiment 2, a similar accuracy-confidence dissociation was found, and the misinformation effect occurred mostly with fine-grained responses, suggesting that responding was based on recollected details. We argue that the results support source-monitoring accounts of accuracy and resolution rather than accounts based on trace strength.

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Published date: 2011
Additional Information: Early view article

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 148641
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/148641
ISSN: 0888-4080
PURE UUID: dfe8e4cc-3b8a-402d-9fbf-7469c4cc4e20

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Date deposited: 28 Apr 2010 13:14
Last modified: 25 Nov 2019 21:19

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