The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Probing the microscopic flexibility of DNA from melting temperatures

Probing the microscopic flexibility of DNA from melting temperatures
Probing the microscopic flexibility of DNA from melting temperatures
The microscopic flexibility of DNA is a key ingredient for understanding its interaction with proteins and drugs but is still poorly understood and technically challenging to measure. Several experimental methods probe very long DNA samples, but these miss local flexibility details. Others mechanically disturb or modify short molecules and therefore do not obtain flexibility properties of unperturbed and pristine DNA. Here, we show that it is possible to extract very detailed flexibility information about unmodified DNA from melting temperatures with statistical physics models. We were able to retrieve, from published melting temperatures, several established flexibility properties such as the presence of highly flexible TATA regions of genomic DNA and support recent findings that DNA is very flexible at short length scales. New information about the nanoscale Na+ concentration dependence of DNA flexibility was determined and we show the key role of ApT and TpA steps when it comes to ion-dependent flexibility and melting temperatures.
1745-2473
769-773
Weber, Gerald
7cfc4eb7-a658-44fd-97e3-b3be79a6615f
Essex, Jonathan W.
1f409cfe-6ba4-42e2-a0ab-a931826314b5
Neylon, Cameron
697f067b-db25-4c41-9618-28f4b74f73aa
Weber, Gerald
7cfc4eb7-a658-44fd-97e3-b3be79a6615f
Essex, Jonathan W.
1f409cfe-6ba4-42e2-a0ab-a931826314b5
Neylon, Cameron
697f067b-db25-4c41-9618-28f4b74f73aa

Weber, Gerald, Essex, Jonathan W. and Neylon, Cameron (2009) Probing the microscopic flexibility of DNA from melting temperatures. Nature Physics, 5 (10), 769-773. (doi:10.1038/NPHYS1371).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The microscopic flexibility of DNA is a key ingredient for understanding its interaction with proteins and drugs but is still poorly understood and technically challenging to measure. Several experimental methods probe very long DNA samples, but these miss local flexibility details. Others mechanically disturb or modify short molecules and therefore do not obtain flexibility properties of unperturbed and pristine DNA. Here, we show that it is possible to extract very detailed flexibility information about unmodified DNA from melting temperatures with statistical physics models. We were able to retrieve, from published melting temperatures, several established flexibility properties such as the presence of highly flexible TATA regions of genomic DNA and support recent findings that DNA is very flexible at short length scales. New information about the nanoscale Na+ concentration dependence of DNA flexibility was determined and we show the key role of ApT and TpA steps when it comes to ion-dependent flexibility and melting temperatures.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 30 August 2009
Organisations: Chemistry

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 149187
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/149187
ISSN: 1745-2473
PURE UUID: 975331d1-7cef-45e1-bf8d-0173393b281a
ORCID for Jonathan W. Essex: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2639-2746

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Apr 2010 08:49
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:20

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Gerald Weber
Author: Cameron Neylon

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×