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Social rights, social justice and pension outcomes in four multi-pillar systems

Social rights, social justice and pension outcomes in four multi-pillar systems
Social rights, social justice and pension outcomes in four multi-pillar systems
Egalitarian liberal justice requires redistributive income transfers to protect the basic liberties of all citizens, yet it has been asserted that privatisation is fundamentally inegalitarian, and therefore likely to impair the autonomy of the least advantaged.

This article assesses the redistributive potential of public and private pension arrangements by simulating the probable outcomes for individuals across a range of circumstances under the multi-pillar retirement systems of Britain, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and Switzerland. The findings show that the public pensions model may compare unfavourably with systems that rely substantially on privately administered provision when both are appraised in terms of distributive justice.

In just systems, what counts is the role and scope of the public authority in framing and securing compliance with egalitarian aims and objectives, not the locus of retirement scheme administration
pension systems, justice, europe, social security, privatisation, micro-simulation
1748-6831
129-137
Bridgen, Paul
6a2060f6-cbab-47d4-a831-ff82350055c9
Meyer, Traute
ee469bf0-ab32-43ac-9f25-1261c24123fe
Bridgen, Paul
6a2060f6-cbab-47d4-a831-ff82350055c9
Meyer, Traute
ee469bf0-ab32-43ac-9f25-1261c24123fe

Bridgen, Paul and Meyer, Traute (2009) Social rights, social justice and pension outcomes in four multi-pillar systems. Journal of Comparative Social Welfare, 25 (2), 129-137. (doi:10.1080/17486830902789756).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Egalitarian liberal justice requires redistributive income transfers to protect the basic liberties of all citizens, yet it has been asserted that privatisation is fundamentally inegalitarian, and therefore likely to impair the autonomy of the least advantaged.

This article assesses the redistributive potential of public and private pension arrangements by simulating the probable outcomes for individuals across a range of circumstances under the multi-pillar retirement systems of Britain, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and Switzerland. The findings show that the public pensions model may compare unfavourably with systems that rely substantially on privately administered provision when both are appraised in terms of distributive justice.

In just systems, what counts is the role and scope of the public authority in framing and securing compliance with egalitarian aims and objectives, not the locus of retirement scheme administration

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More information

Published date: June 2009
Keywords: pension systems, justice, europe, social security, privatisation, micro-simulation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 150403
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/150403
ISSN: 1748-6831
PURE UUID: 5350f135-fb03-4d8f-8726-82ebe0f06a79
ORCID for Paul Bridgen: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6039-3254

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 May 2010 09:50
Last modified: 01 Nov 2019 01:37

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